Duckboats.net
Skip to Content


Home : Resources & Reference : Carvers Corner :

Post deleted by John Lawrence

(Page 1 of 2)
Post deleted by John Lawrence

Last edited by:

John Lawrence: Feb 13, 2010, 11:23 AM
Post deleted by John Lawrence In reply to

Last edited by:

John Lawrence: Feb 13, 2010, 11:23 AM
Post deleted by John Lawrence In reply to

Last edited by:

John Lawrence: Feb 13, 2010, 11:29 AM
Post deleted by John Lawrence In reply to

Last edited by:

John Lawrence: Feb 13, 2010, 11:31 AM
Post deleted by John Lawrence In reply to

Last edited by:

John Lawrence: Feb 13, 2010, 11:33 AM
Post deleted by John Lawrence In reply to

Last edited by:

John Lawrence: Feb 13, 2010, 11:34 AM
Post deleted by John Lawrence In reply to

Last edited by:

John Lawrence: Feb 13, 2010, 11:34 AM
Post deleted by John Lawrence In reply to

Last edited by:

John Lawrence: Feb 13, 2010, 11:36 AM
Post deleted by John Lawrence In reply to

Last edited by:

John Lawrence: Feb 13, 2010, 10:06 AM
Quote Reply
Re: The Development of a Personal Style In reply to
My take:

A style is how one consistently diverges from or exaggerates nature, but still allows the finished product to be recognizable as the subject.
Quote Reply
Re: The Development of a Personal Style In reply to
Good stuff !

I printed this so I can review it a few times throughout the day and ponder your excelllent commentary.

My opinion: "Style" is an artists interpretation of what he/she sees and how he/she chooses to share it with others.
______________________________________________
It's all about the doin'


Last edited by:

John Klingenstein: Feb 8, 2010, 9:07 AM
Quote Reply
Re: The Development of a Personal Style In reply to
jim,

thanks for reposting this. I am having problems envisioning sketch BB which i was on the DCF as well. I can't tell which part is up down right left, etc.
Quote Reply
Re: The Development of a Personal Style In reply to
Kris,

Diagram BB is a representation of the underside or the tail. So try and think of it as being underneath the ducks rear end and looking up.



http://www.johnlawrencedecoys.com
Quote Reply
Re: The Development of a Personal Style In reply to
does the red line in BB represent the back edge of the tail?
Quote Reply
Re: The Development of a Personal Style In reply to
Kris,

The red line in all of those drawing represents the end of the two groups that make the flank . The end of the tail will be on the lowest aprt of the drawing. So the tails are pointing down.



http://www.johnlawrencedecoys.com
Quote Reply
Re: The Development of a Personal Style In reply to
John, thanks for posting this. I just had a chance to skim it, but I will be digging deeper.
Quote Reply
Re: The Development of a Personal Style In reply to
Still reading through this John,,It's amazing to see your decoys so similar to your sketches. Good stuff
Quote Reply
Re: The Development of a Personal Style In reply to
Good afternoon everyone, (late night for me), I’m Mike Chase and I’m currently serving in Afghanistan. You may not know that John sent me a special “care package” with two cedar decoy cut-outs in it with all the relevant landmarks already marked as described in the above tutorial. One is a full size mallard drake and the other is a miniature mallard/black.
I’m posting this for two reasons. One is to show that John’s willingness to share this art form with others goes beyond posting instructions and pictures on the internet. Secondly I’m hoping John can use my current progress to give a virtual classroom demonstration of how this process looks in wood with a complete rookie using only the simplest of tools.
Here is the progress I’ve made so far. I basically have the head done with only final sanding and bill details to add. I’ll also have to drill the eye holes and set the ones that John also provided.
I’ve rounded the top portion down from the top and up from the bottom to meet at the Mason-Dixon Line. I’ve also removed and rounded the sides down to the side pockets where John also removed a large portion of the stock with a drill press. When I first saw this after taking it out of the box, my first thoughts were, “Holy cow that cuts way too deep into the sides”. After rounding it out, it does present a very attractive shape that has a great sense of style to it.
I’ve started removing stock from the back in between the two Continental Divides and rounding them towards the divides which represents the highest parts on the duck’s back.
Here is where I need my first pointer. The back towards the tail has a rather pronounced hump. If you look close in the picture, you can see my penciled in line that represents what I think the slope should be towards the tail. I’ve done both supported raised primaries and sloping backs but I’m not real sure what the intent was with this particular pattern. Is it for a sloping back and possibly an oil gland tail curl?
I think this will turn out very well and provide a visual real world learning experience for not only me, but everyone that cares to follow along. I hope my progress will not be so slow that people lose interest. Stay tuned, I think you’ll enjoy this.




Mike
Go make some shavings, you'll feel better

Last edited by:

A Michael Chase: Feb 13, 2010, 6:30 AM
Quote Reply
Re: The Development of a Personal Style In reply to
Ok, any ideas on what I'm doing wrong on the pictures? I browsed to select the photo, check the "inline" box and then UPLOAD ATTACHMENT button. It says there is an attachment on the reply page prior to me hitting Post Reply.

I hope I can get this resolved so you can see the photos.

Mike
Go make some shavings, you'll feel better
Quote Reply
Re: The Development of a Personal Style In reply to
Michael

I see exactly where you went wrong. In fact it's the thin that gets everyone. When you selected inline you also have to tell where you want the picture to show up. Do that by using the syntax [inline filename.jpg] whever you want the picure to go.
Quote Reply
Re: The Development of a Personal Style In reply to
Mike,

Although I there aren't any photos visible yet I'll let you know that when I drew the pattern I left you enough room towards the tail to have tail curls if you wish. If you'd like to make it a sleek back then just carve that extra bit away and adjust the slope back from the shoulders.

And about how much wood I removed above the side pockets. One of the hardest parts for guys to understand when they are just getting started is just how far the side pockets on a duck wrap around the top of the back. I like a wide body on my decoys. They simply ride the water better. The blank I sent isn't quite as wide as I would normally cut for myself, but it is wider than anyone's established patterns for a mallard and a beginning point to understand how the whole area comes together. When carving the top edge of the back of the side pocket if you don't achieve that wrap around affect then it tends to leave the whole area looking squarish.

If you are just interested in making servicable hunting decoys no big deal a little squareness won't hurt trying to decoy ducks. But in the overall scheme of the style tutorial I stressed the fluidity of multiple curves, so that one aspect becomes much more important.

Just in case anyone is interested other than a little bit of my cedar reserves, two sets of eyes and some time to cut it out and go to the post office, it cost me a grand total of $8.60 to ship Mike the decoys blanks in Afghanistan. I had about $60 on me when I went to the post office and i figured if that didn't do it I'd get some more money and come back the next day, but I was very surprised, in a good way, just how little it cost. So like I told you before, when you are done with those let me know and I'll send you some more.

Keep us posted on your progress and keep safe Mike.



http://www.johnlawrencedecoys.com

Last edited by:

John Lawrence: Feb 12, 2010, 2:03 PM
Quote Reply
Re: The Development of a Personal Style In reply to
  
Ok, I went back and edited my post and added the original picture. Not a very intuitive process, but that's neither here nor there. Thanks John. I think I'll make it a slick but that may have to wait. I've going to sharpen my knives tonight and probably wait until I make another mess.

Here is a front view to show how deep those side pockets are. I've only really done one side (port) and just barely touched the starboard side so you can see the blockyness that this eliminates. I see where the stability comes from as you can see the height to width ratio and how squat it looks. I really like the look. The drilling helped me not to be timid about removing stock. It was already gone so there was nothing to worry about. I'm always afraid to being too aggressive and doing something I can't put back.

I'll post more when I get something that shows part of the process.

Mike

For me to post a picture is a two step process that involves a half mile walk, but I get it figured out here shortly.
Go make some shavings, you'll feel better

Last edited by:

A Michael Chase: Feb 13, 2010, 8:18 PM
Quote Reply
Re: The Development of a Personal Style In reply to
It looks real good Mike. Just remember to concentrate on the roundness on all of the body parts. A good trick is to close your eyes and run you fingers over an area to find bumps and flat spots. Frequently your eyes can deceive you so take them out of the equation.

He's already starting to show a certain cockiness. Big and Bold. When you get him hollowed you'll be surprised as to how well it will float because of it's width.

Keep us posted.



http://www.johnlawrencedecoys.com
Quote Reply
Re: The Development of a Personal Style In reply to
The front view has been added to the above post using the edit function.
Go make some shavings, you'll feel better
Quote Reply
Re: The Development of a Personal Style In reply to
Mike I like the looks of the bird, anxious to see what it will look like sanded. When you get done let me know I'll send some heads toward you along with some Swiss 80grit. Hope by then it will be warm enough to cut some heads out without gloves..lol