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Post deleted by John Lawrence

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Re: The Development of a Personal Style In reply to
Great information John! I am still in the process of just trying to get my decoys to look like ducks but this really gives me new ideas for future carvings. For those who don't know John I can tell you that I completely agree with A. Michael Chase that John is very generous as he was one of the only people at Westlake last year who took an interest in getting to know me and also introduced me to other carvers and made me feel a part of the carving community. I was a beginner with only one carving done at the time, and it wasn't a good one. John gave me advice on my carving, invited me to join him at another competition, invited me to enter a decoy with him and his friends in this years hunting rig division (touchy subject I know) and even tracked me down to make sure I knew about this website. For all those veteran carvers out there I would ask you to take the time to get to know some of the new people at these competitions. They will greatly appreciate it and it can only help the future of the decoy carving tradition. I look forward to meeting some of you guys at Westlake. I can only improve from last year as I was the first redhead to be plucked from the pool...maybe this year I can be the second!

Last edited by:

Andy Hildreth: Feb 19, 2010, 1:09 PM
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Re: The Development of a Personal Style In reply to
Just after writing the above post I found out my son's friend threw a ball in my house and knocked my redhead for Westlake off the shelf causing damage to the bill, head and tail. Maybe I can keep up my record of the first decoy yanked!
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Re: The Development of a Personal Style In reply to
Andy: You are spot on my friend. Now, go fix that readhead or make another. You have time. I wish like anything I could go to Westlake. Maybe in 2011, (then I can be the first tossed out of the pool).

Mike
Go make some shavings, you'll feel better
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Re: The Development of a Personal Style In reply to
A. Michael....I can fix the damage...it probaly did the least damage possible considering it fell 5 feet onto a wood floor. I just want to say thanks for all your doing for our country over there in Afghanistan. Your service is greatly appreciated. A coworker of mine is being deployed again to serve over there just 3 weeks shy of the date he was supposed to get out of the Marines. I consider him a true hero along with the rest of you serving over there whether your front line , back line wherever! Keep up the good work and hopefully you can be with us at Westlake next year!
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Re: The Development of a Personal Style In reply to
  


Go make some shavings, you'll feel better

Last edited by:

A Michael Chase: Feb 20, 2010, 9:03 PM
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Re: The Development of a Personal Style In reply to
I received my drawknife in the mail the other day and decided to make a mess of my room again. Here's the progress so far.

Mike


Go make some shavings, you'll feel better

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A Michael Chase: Feb 28, 2010, 8:19 AM
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turning the head? In reply to
John,

Great post. I've been only been carving for about four months and got to figure W before I got loss a little but am going to revisit over the next couple of days. Have have a couple of birds on my bench right now and you covered the pieces the the bird that I really didn't quite get how it came all together so thanks a lot for that. I can see the difference right off the back and am really happy with the results. My question is if you turn the head how does that effect the breast and the ditches that form the breast and lower neck? The one pic of the bird with the head really turned was great but does the breast and the ditch become pushed narrow on the side that is hidden behind the head? Can't quite get my mind around how that moves around. Thanks again for taking the time to put together such a great tutorial.

Thanks

Kevin
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Re: turning the head? In reply to
Kevin,

Since the formation of the ditches are linked to "fixed" parts of the anatomy they are always present. But yes one or the other can and will get compressed depending on how severley you turn the neck and head. The drawings I made this turorial from show the hen goldeneye I made for the Buddy Rig this year. In these photos you see the finished decoy. In the first photo you see along the back and you see the beginning of the tops of the ditches.



As you can see on the left side the ditch is expanded somehwat due to the head being turned and the hollow created by where the neck would be if the head was straight on. In this photo you can see how the right side is compressed a little, mainly because the neck filled up some of that space.



As for the breast it really remains the same unless the duck starts to roll to one side or the other. In that case the shape of the breast really remains the same its just that some of in on the side that is being rolled to goes under the waterline and we just can see it. Hope this helps.



http://www.johnlawrencedecoys.com
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Re: The Development of a Personal Style In reply to
Excellent tutorial! I will be re-reading this when I am not at work :)

Thanks,

Jon (a noob carver)
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Re: The Development of a Personal Style In reply to

In Reply To
Excellent tutorial! I will be re-reading this when I am not at work :)

Thanks,

Jon (a noob carver)

_________________________________________________________________________________________________


Exactly! I will too!
watch winders

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Re: The Development of a Personal Style In reply to
Is there anyway to get the photos for all of this or are they lost in space?

Thanks!
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Re: The Development of a Personal Style In reply to
Amazing
D Monet
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Re: The Development of a Personal Style In reply to
great read i found it very helpful as i have just started making my own decoys and your drawing really help with the shaping i am printing this out to put at my work bench. thanks
semper fi