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Building a layout boat

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Building a layout boat
I bought some plans for a erie layout boat that I have been waiting for just the right time to build. I hope to get started in it this fall. Can anyone give me any advice?
Theo
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Re: Building a layout boat In reply to
Which plans do you have? Busick?

I'll some things I learned so far later this evening when I have time.
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Its a waterfowl works plan
Theo
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Those are the Old Busick plans.
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That is the original Busick plan. Tony made a good move by buying the rights to it.

I have everything cut out and some of the construction done. Here is what I have learned so far. Some of it will likely not make sense until you get to that step.

Where some kind of gloves when handling the 1/4 plywood. I am still pulling splinters out of my hands. Every time I touched the stuff, I got a splinter or two. It was annoying.

Maybe try ironing the plans out to make them flatter. Mine were older and the creases made it tricky to layout the paper templates on the wood.

Make sure to use weights to hold down the template when tracing them on to the wood. This helps to keep them from moving around especially on the big pieces.

Frames #5 and #7 have doublers that need to be exact matches. Cut out the #5 plywood frame first. Then use the plywood one to trace around for the pine one, or visa versa. I cut them both out using the paper template and they didn't match. Operator error, but the paper is difficult to keep still on the wood. Cut out the #7 frame, then use its profile for the #7A. When you match up the pieces and screw them together you can use a spoke shave to make them perfect.

When you drill the holes in the apron pieces, countersink the holes for the screws at the same time. Then flip the pieces all over to put the countersinks on the bottom where they belong. It is more difficult to countersink from below if you wait to do it later.

Make sure you put something flat and heavy over the wax paper when you glass the apron pieces together. That way they come out nice and smooth.

I am using TiteBond III for the places where the joints have a good fit and to laminate frames together. The plans call for epoxy, but I have read that Titebond III can be stronger with a good fitting joint. Titebond is a lot easier to use as well.

That is as far as I have got. I hope to finish the box portion this weekend. Although I have to work on Sat.
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Where did you get your materials?

I am not sure where to get the glass or the resin. I am hoping to make this really reasonable boat build. I know those 2 things are going to cost the most.
Theo
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I am going to use poly resin. Fo a couple reasons. I can get it locally and it is starting to get cold here at night. Also it is cheaper. I have some left over glass from another project. I don't know it I have enough yet though.

Even the Bondo brand poly resin was $50 for a gallon at the hardware store. I only bought one gallon so far. I will see how far that gets me and they sell half gallons if that will finish it. I don't plan on painting all the frames with resin. I will use thinned paint for the first coat then a couple more coats of paint.

You are closer to US Composites than me and should be able to do better than me on shipping and get epoxy.

With the poly resin, I plan on storing it out of the weather and SUN in the off season.

Home Depot had the best prices on 1x pine and plywood. However, the closest to me is 30 more mile than the local lumber yard. With gas it would have been a wash. Their 1/4 ply was $20 ea and the ones I bought were $27 ea.

I bought a full sheet of 3/4 ply, but the plans call for only a 4'x4' piece. I made sure to only cut out of half of the sheet. It seems like you could almost make two boats out of the 4'x4' piece. So if you can get the half sheet, go ahead. you will still have extra.
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Re: Building a layout boat In reply to
Correction to previous. Screw holes in the apron for the box side need to be countersunk from above, not below. The ones for the frames, below.
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I had most of the lumber here around my place and I am 5 mins from a lowes. They had 5mm (.20inch compared to .25inch) 4x8 plywood I am thinking about using for $9.99 a sheet. I may just use it for the top cover pieces.

So far I have $12 for the pine boards + the cost of the plans. I hope I can go up to some boat shops on Lake Michigan a find a deal on the fiberglass and epoxy.

I laid out all patterns and I am ready to cut all the pine pieces in the next day or two. I ll let you know how it goes.

So you are using the titebond III instead of the 3"tape and epoxy at the joints?
Theo

Last edited by:

Theodore Schrader: Sep 24, 2012, 6:24 AM
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Re: Building a layout boat In reply to
The plans call for making fillets out of Bondo in all the corners before glassing the box. I found that a plastic spoon works really good to make them. Drag the spoon backwards. Then before it hardens, but after it kicks, gently smooth it down with a rag soaked in acetone.

The spoon and acetone saved me a lot of sanding. There is still some to do, but not much. When I put the fillets on the outside, I will use two spoons to scoop and place the putty before smoothing it out.
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Re: Building a layout boat In reply to
Taller saw horses are easier on the back. I found out the painful way.


I painted all the frames, box and apron before beveling the frames. I used roll-on bed liner for the box. Don't worry about getting paint on the frame edges. It comes off easy later. The apint also makes it easy to tell what has been faired and what hasn't.

A sharp bladed spoke shave works well to bevel all the frames and apron. Set it to take a heavy cut.
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I didn't bring fram #1 down far enough. It was a pain to get those pieces of decking on. I did it but there is a noticable bend over the frame. For the angled frames on the foot end, I brought them down quite a bit to make it easier. Sure I lost a bit of corve the boat, but not much. The stern decking went on much easier.

I quit counter-sinking the decking holes. It takes a good amount of pressure to go around the frames and counter sinking lead to tearing out of one hole. some of the screws went down enough on their own, but don't over-tighten. The rest I will run out, counter-sink, and run back in.

I may just be done in time for next weekends openner. have you made any progress?