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"Water Aspiration"

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"Water Aspiration"
The other day a friend and I went clamming with his two dogs. As we clam, the dogs make retrieves in to the bay. The one dog went for a retrieve and took a mouthful of water- "Water Intoxication". The dog stopped the retrieve and swam directly back to shore and just stood there. The dog was laboring to breath and his eyes began to get cloudy. Fortunately, the dogs owner knew how to give the dog mouth to mouth.(nose).

After the first couple of breaths in to the dog, some water came out of it's mouth. At the same time we had elevated the dog's hind legs. After about 10 minutes of monitoring the dog, occasional breathing in to its nose, the dog's eyes cleared up and breathing returned to normal. He did take the dog to the vet that day as precaution and the vet prescribed and antibiotic to take considering it had swallowed water and the possibility of infection.

Wanted to share the story, as someday, your dog may experience such and hopefully you will know how to respond to save the dog's life-

Last edited by:

TA Smith: Apr 19, 2018, 4:18 AM
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Re: "Water Intoxication" In reply to
Never heard of such a thing happening, thanks for making us aware. At least now i know what to look for and do.
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Re: "Water Intoxication" In reply to
What occurred was water aspiration, apparently deep enough or in sufficient volume penetrating the dog's lung field to shut down gas exchange partially. The owner should continue to monitor the dog to make sure no stomach fluids made it into his lungs or trachea(probably didn't happen, but be careful) which, since these would contain gastric acid would be very low pH and possibly induce tissue damage. The other issue with aspirated stomach fluids is that they can induce aspiration pneumonia due to the bacterial load that "go along for the ride". I have no idea how clean the water you were clamming in was, but it was high saline content and likely had significant bacterial loads, some of them potentially pathogens.

Water intoxication is a condition where body fluids become so diluted by water volume ingested that electrolyte concentrations fall markedly, altering diffusion rates and osmosis impacted nutrient dispersal into tissues. This outcome would require the dog to drink a very large volume of water. In high saline conditions, the dog would likely puke well prior water intoxication onset due to the high "osmotic load" incurred.

Last edited by:

RLLigman: Apr 19, 2018, 2:42 AM
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Re: "Water Intoxication" In reply to
RL hit it, Clearly a case of aspiration. Basically, the dog almost drowned without ever going under.
This happens in humans too, there was case of "delayed drowning" in the news a few years back down here, Swimmer aspirated a good bit of saltwater but never really went under, didnt pass out. Coughed up some water, family walked him back to the condo to rest, thought he was OK. Three hours later kid went unconcious and was DOA at the hospital.


Carl
Mobile, AL
DHBP Member since 1998

"Life is too short to drink bad beer."
Disclaimer: This post and/or report is not a substantiation of or reflection on the true accuracy of the present surveying methods. It is only a report on or comment concerning local observation and/or results. Your results and observation may vary based on your location, local water conditions, food supply, weather conditions and migratory patterns "
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Re: "Water Intoxication" In reply to
I believe I know who this happened to. I won't share the name but I saw the story on my FB feed. Scary stuff. That reaction was what saved the dog's life. I know the person involved and he is seasoned and experienced.
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Re: "Water Intoxication" In reply to
I was told by lifeguards salt water in the lungs means you have to go to the hospital. The salt causes fluid build up in your lungs.
Which is probably what happen to that young man.
Ken