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NJ Garvey Restoration

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NJ Garvey Restoration
Well with my recent progress and the new format and easier way to post pics, I guess I'll get this thread going.

I picked up this Garvey from a friend who got it from the original owner at the jersey shore. It was made by John Petzak of Parkertown around 1993. All cedar construction, traditional cross planked. A book called "Down the Jersey Shore" by Russell Roberts and Richard Youmans has a nice write up about Petzak.




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Haven't quite figured out how to continue typing after adding photos so I'll start another post.

Here's the boat when I picked it up and first assessed the repairs. This was last fall and a lot has changed since then. New house with smaller shop and the move has had me scrambling. I finally got a chance to finish repairs and start glass work in the last few weeks.

The boat was originally glassed with polyester so it had some delamination which caused cracks, which water got into and was rotting some of the cedar. The chine logs were also rotted out and some were removed. I think this boat had some water sitting in it at some point.

I had to replace both chines, and only one section of a plank on the starboard side near the chine.

More to come...

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I stripped the old glass off, replaced the chine logs, and the rotted out side plank, and re fastened the entire hull with stainless screws.
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With the initial coat of fairing I used thickened epoxy with wood flour to fill the cracks and screw holes as well as some of the imperfections in the hull. Then I sanded and went over it wil us composites fairing compound. Then sanded and did it again. The hull is fair enough for a duck boat.

Then I began the fiberglassing process. The sides and transom were a bear with the vertical surface but I managed to get the 6 oz cloth on both sides and the transom. The bottom will get two layers of 6 oz and I will fill the weave completely. Will be a couple weeks before I can get to it again so making it to tuckerton with this boat doesn't look like it's going to happen.




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Great pics! Looks like a fun restoration.
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I clammed for years out of a cross planked garvey on the Great South Bay. On a cross chop she would Rock and roll over the waves. Mine was double decked and that kept a lot of stuff out of the bilge. Mine also had a wheelhouse. Good luck with the boat.
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Finally got it painted over the last few months.




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Then I flipped it and painted the inside. And here it found its home on the trailer.




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Cedar false floor going in slowly but surely.
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The second maiden voyage of its life after the rehab. Overall it performed better than expected. It drafted very little water, was extremely stable, and solid. My 15 hp Suzuki pushed it well. Not winning any races but it got on plane with me, my dad and some fishing gear. We even got a few flounder to boot. Very satisfying bringing this boat back to life.
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Good morning, Tom~


Spectacular restoration - congratulations!


re adding text after photos: I have found it easiest to draft the entire text, then add photos. (Because navigating past the photo can be tough. If you slide the lower grey bar all the way to the right, though, you can find the lower right corner of the photo and hit ENTER to get to the next blank line.)


Question 1: How did you remove the polyester resin 'glass? Did you try a torch?


Question 2: Will you treat the new cedar decks - or just let weather? I might try a (residential) deck treatment - like Thompsons Water Seal or such. That would retain the natural non-slip but also keep some moisture out of the wood.


All the best,


SJS

Steven Jay Sanford
Pencil Brook Farm
South Cambridge, NY
http://www.stevenjaysanford.com


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Nice resto. I can remember the day when boats of that style were everywhere in my area. Lots were used by commercial crabbers when they first started. My brother actually used one up to the point when crossing a hard chop you watched the floor move! That hull was referred to as a scow in my neck of the woods with a slightly different bow and a little forward v they became chinoteague scows. Both hulls have long sense been replaced by Carolina skiffs and its hard to find people using either of the afore mentioned hulls around here. A labor of love on your part to bring her back to life!
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Great restoration and a nice flattie too!


Carl
Mobile, AL
DHBP Member since 1998

"Life is too short to drink bad beer."
Disclaimer: This post and/or report is not a substantiation of or reflection on the true accuracy of the present surveying methods. It is only a report on or comment concerning local observation and/or results. Your results and observation may vary based on your location, local water conditions, food supply, weather conditions and migratory patterns "
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Thanks guys.

Steve, I peeled a lot of it right off. Then tried a heat gun on the tough spots with a little success. My best option was an old handplane. It took some of the wood off but it all got sanded and faired out.

As far as the floor, I was instructed by a friend with experience to leave it unfinished. This turned out to be a good option with fishing and bare feet. When I would stand on the painted bench, the green paint would be very hot. The unfinished cedar stayed comfortable. It will live in my garage or under a decent cover when not in use for preservation.