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More FL mushroom

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More FL mushroom
 

For the mushroom gurus....here are a couple pictures of the same sort of mushrooms that I posted last time...ive got a big crop of em after getting close to 12 inches of rain this week. What would yall suggest as a good book for learning about mushrooms? These come from oak/pine areas if it matters




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Re: More FL mushroom In reply to
they look like chantrelles.

i have the audubon society field guide and a book called "mushrooms and other fungi of north america" by Roger Phillips. i grew up picking shrooms from people who know them well and there is actually one of the worlds foremost Mycologists in my town too! i still would recomend signing up for a local mushroom page on facebook not only will it give you ID help but it will be a litmus test of what is popping up in the woods that way you know what you are looking for when you go out hiking.

"Remember that it is not the so much the appearance of the bird in the hand but the effect of a half-gunshot off that counts" Duck Shooting Along the Atlantic Tidewater
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Re: More FL mushroom In reply to
Dani,

Ditto what Chris said. I'm just a rank amateur and there will be many folks who will not offer any kind of ID advice over the internet. (they are just being cautious)

I just had a plate full of Golden Oyster mushrooms for breakfast. Yumm

Hope you do find out what you have there and can enjoy the wild bounty as well. Just a guess, but anything growing on or next to an Oak will probably be preferable to ones growing on or next to a Pine. I could be way of base but that would be my guess.

Take care, Huntindave McCann Smile SHELL ROCK IA “As sailors grow older, the wiser ones move to smaller boats.” —Thomas Firth Jones, Multihull Voyaging

Last edited by:

Huntindave McCann: Aug 5, 2018, 6:26 AM
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Re: More FL mushroom In reply to
chantrelles are mycorrhizal, so they are symbiotic with certain species of trees such as oaks, pines, beech's, even hemlock. one of our chant patches is associated with hemlock and has given us no gastrointestinal distress.

saprophytic mushrooms like chickens (both the cincinnatus and sulphureus species) consume nutrients from decaying trees. i was always taught not to eat a chicken off pine, which i saw a lot of out west, because it pulls resins from the tree. but i have heard from people out there they are fine to consume, not to many hardwoods up there, so if you didnt eat shrooms off pine, cedar, fir etc. there wouldn't be much to eat!

good luck with shrooms they are very interesting and there is a lot to learn.

just remember all mushrooms are edible, some only once!

"Remember that it is not the so much the appearance of the bird in the hand but the effect of a half-gunshot off that counts" Duck Shooting Along the Atlantic Tidewater
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Re: More FL mushroom In reply to
Thanks Chris, Dave. I thought I had a mushroom book and I found it when I went searching for it....go figger. I'll look up and see if my library has some others as well since mine is pretty low on color pictures. I'll see if there is a mushroom club or something like that around here, maybe someone who knows what they're doing who might not mind me tagging along to learn...I had a neighbor stop by and ask if I'd seen the oyster mushrooms since I'd moved here. Apparently this property would get lots of good oyster mushrooms....and maybe they are still here and I just haven't noticed. Only real reason I noticed these is because of their color and the fact that I have LOTS of them right now.