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Decoy bags...
Anyone here ever saw up their own canvas decoy bags? Individual pocket type bags. I have a sewing machine, and a basic knowledge, but I've never attempted such a feat.

Thanks, Jon

"Each decoy you touch holds memories of, past, present and God Willing, future hunts. The places, birds, men, boats, dogs and days you spent doing what you so dearly love and enjoy"- Vince Pagliaorli
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Re: Decoy bags... In reply to
I have contemplated it previously, not being able to see well I purchased them instead
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Re: Decoy bags... In reply to
Tom Modin wrote:
I have contemplated it previously, not being able to see well I purchased them instead


Tom, Sorry to hear you are having trouble seeing. Please be careful with those carving knives. Wink

Take care, Huntindave McCann Smile SHELL ROCK IA “As sailors grow older, the wiser ones move to smaller boats.” —Thomas Firth Jones, Multihull Voyaging
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Re: Decoy bags... In reply to
So Jon wants to 'saw' some bags and Tom is having trouble 'seeing' in general...as the resident decoy seamstress, I think I will refer you to Steve Sanford...he is much better at spelling and grammar than myself. If you get past all that I'm sure he could assist with the sewing too!

Chuck



"A little learning is a dangerous thing;
drink deep, or taste not the Pierian spring:
there shallow draughts intoxicate the brain,
and drinking largely sobers us again."


A. Pope
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Re: Decoy bags... In reply to
Jon -

I have individual decoy bags that were sewn for me by friends and relatives. I do not use the pocket style bags. Bought some, did not care for them for my own reasons.

None are made from canvas. Some are camo cloth, some thick durable cotton, and others are made from pant legs cut from old jeans, corduroy, and work pants. Any durable fabric that can be reused for another purpose. Pant legs you only need to sew shut the narrow end.

If ya want fancy, a strong line/tie for the open end, made from decoy cord can be sewn in, but is not necessary.

Most of the bags are well over 25 years old and still work.

my 2 cents

Best
VP











"Art does not reproduce what is visible - but makes things visible." ~ Paul Klee, artist, 1920
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Re: Decoy bags... In reply to
Good morning, Jon and Chuck~


My answer here is "sort of"....


When I was a kid - and had just bought and re-painted my first brand new Herter's Model 72 Mallards and Black Ducks, I sewed individual burlap bags (with decoy line drawstrings). As predicted by my Dad, I used them exactly once - too much bother under gunning situations.


Later, when I began carving my own hollow wooden gunning stool, I sewed up (from a heavy cotton twill) a 6-pocket bag/back pack. Again, used just a few times.


For many seasons, I carried my rigs in burlap bags - mostly potato bags from eastern Long Island.


I have made a bunch of fleece individual bags - for transporting my fancy birds to shows and talks. They are a nice thick olive fleece but have no place in a gunning boat in my opinion.



Then, the Slotted Decoy Bag Era commenced. I've owned a bunch. I still have all of the cotton canvas ones I've owned, but most of the polyester ones have succumbed to either mice or age. My preference now is for the bags made by Dave Clark - cotton canvas with mesh bottoms and with each divider sewn to the bottom of the bag. I have modified one of his 6-pocket bags by sewing on a longer loop/handle of 2-inch-wide webbing so I can sling the bag over my shoulder on walk-in hunts.



Dave is at: https://www.decoybags.biz/



In addition to pocketed bags, he also makes canvas "cylinder bags" - similar to what I made in burlap as a kid - as well as fleece bags.

I do not understand the sequence of sewing a multi-pocketed decoy bag, but I know that it would take me a very long time to figure out a way to work the fabric 'neath the sewing head on my SailRite. Just as with auto repairs - and most medical procedures - I am happy to pay a professional for their experience and quality.


All the best,


SJS

Steven Jay Sanford
Pencil Brook Farm
South Cambridge, NY
http://www.stevenjaysanford.com


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Re: Decoy bags... In reply to
Steve, Dave's web site decoybags.biz still shows up, He has a new web site which is

http://www.canvasbacks.net

I will see him at the Easton Waterfowl Festival tomorrow



My answer here is "sort of"....


When I was a kid - and had just bought and re-painted my first brand new Herter's Model 72 Mallards and Black Ducks, I sewed individual burlap bags (with decoy line drawstrings). As predicted by my Dad, I used them exactly once - too much bother under gunning situations.


Later, when I began carving my own hollow wooden gunning stool, I sewed up (from a heavy cotton twill) a 6-pocket bag/back pack. Again, used just a few times.


For many seasons, I carried my rigs in burlap bags - mostly potato bags from eastern Long Island.


I have made a bunch of fleece individual bags - for transporting my fancy birds to shows and talks. They are a nice thick olive fleece but have no place in a gunning boat in my opinion.



Then, the Slotted Decoy Bag Era commenced. I've owned a bunch. I still have all of the cotton canvas ones I've owned, but most of the polyester ones have succumbed to either mice or age. My preference now is for the bags made by Dave Clark - cotton canvas with mesh bottoms and with each divider sewn to the bottom of the bag. I have modified one of his 6-pocket bags by sewing on a longer loop/handle of 2-inch-wide webbing so I can sling the bag over my shoulder on walk-in hunts.



Dave is at: https://www.decoybags.biz/



In addition to pocketed bags, he also makes canvas "cylinder bags" - similar to what I made in burlap as a kid - as well as fleece bags.

I do not understand the sequence of sewing a multi-pocketed decoy bag, but I know that it would take me a very long time to figure out a way to work the fabric 'neath the sewing head on my SailRite. Just as with auto repairs - and most medical procedures - I am happy to pay a professional for their experience and quality.


All the best,


SJS
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Re: Decoy bags... In reply to
 Jon, have used many bags, including the famous Long Island potato bag.I like Dave's canvasback designs. Have tried a bunch, diane, cabela and few others.
I like the short strap for carrying, as I don't go on long treks. Great for gun shows, decoys etc...
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Re: Decoy bags... In reply to
Thanks, Phil - I should probably bookmark that site.


I should also get to Easton someday. Always too much going on hereabouts at this time of year. Have a great time!


SJS

Steven Jay Sanford
Pencil Brook Farm
South Cambridge, NY
http://www.stevenjaysanford.com


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Re: Decoy bags... In reply to
Steve -


I will admit that at times the individual bags are a PITA. They are only used for some of my marsh rigs(of which I have made/carved several), and never on big water hunts, over large rigs.

In marsh hunting I have more time, and patience to set up and pick up. Use a small spread of better grade decoys, that I do not want to have to repaint, hence the individual bags.

This is part of my "out west rig" most have their own bag.







Most of my decoys have no protection during transportation, and storage, other than a good drying after use. Many of these decoys have been repainted. Some have minor repairs, others have been retired, especially some divers & blacks from the early 1980's. The geese are part of a larger rig that keeps on workin'.

I enjoy old decoys with honest wear and battle scars. Maybe cuz it's a reflection of myself.Wink

The older I get the fewer decoys I use, but sure have plenty to choose from. I do believe that you may be in the same boat.Smile





Best regards
VP











"Art does not reproduce what is visible - but makes things visible." ~ Paul Klee, artist, 1920
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Re: Decoy bags... In reply to
https://customdecoybags.com/t/goose-bags


Diane's decoy bags...again, someone who has been making good ones for years.
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Re: Decoy bags... In reply to
Vince, we may be in the same boat. The older I get, the fewer I use. I remember back when I was in my 20's & 30's, I used to put out, and pick up, 130 blocks, by myself! Now, maybe 40'ish, tops. But, like you say, they are much more meaningful blocks now.

Although they do have their drawbacks, I've gotten used to the slotted bags. They do protect the toy ducks very well, but, they also take up a lot of room.

The problem for me is, since I'm dealing with a few health issues, I have to streamline my operation to make everything as quick and easy as possible. And because of that, my income has been cut considerably, so my funds are not as available as they used to be. Plus, I have lots of time on my hands now
I may play around a bit and see what I can come up with.

I am refurbishing my "new" duckboat, and while I'm at it, I'm going to seriously consider decoy shelves. While they may not protect the blocks quite as well, it should cut down on the time and effort spent on deploying and picking up my stool.

Thanks, Jon

"Each decoy you touch holds memories of, past, present and God Willing, future hunts. The places, birds, men, boats, dogs and days you spent doing what you so dearly love and enjoy"- Vince Pagliaorli
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Re: Decoy bags... In reply to
I will throw in the idea of pillow cases at the thrift stores! I have done this in the past and placed Honker dekes in slotted bags. They are cheap enough where you can dispose of easy or cover large spreads cheaply.

I switched all my big game quarter bags to synthetic and will never go back to those canvas/cotton material. If you can make bags I would buy a cheap synthetic over other types. Also, the big game bags have reflector tape on them which I find useful from time to time.
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Re: Decoy bags... In reply to
Jon -


I very much understand the health issues affecting how, where, and when you hunt. Also the limited income issue. In fact I cannot remember when "robbing Peter to pay Paul", was not a part of waterfowling.

Time IS the plus, so that does work in your favor, as does patience.


You WILL find what works the best for you, and your situation. I have no doubt about that. A gunners age does have it's drawbacks, but it also has it's bright spots. Where there is a will there is a way.


Room for decoys has been a ages old problem that we all struggle with. I much admire the way the old NJ Sneakbox gunners stowed their smaller decoys, and the way the NC gunners stowed their canvas covered decoys, side up and upside down, to conserve space. Practicality ruled, and decoy damage was part of the deal.

It is hard for us newer carver/hunters to deal with that cuz we put so much time, $$$$, and effort into our blocks. Plus the fact that decoy contests makes gunning decoys taxidermy/pretty, so we try to protect that. We tend to treat them as investments, not hunting tools.


Just a sidebar.

When I went to the ODCCA show last March. I took a unused box of FUD decoys, that Adam Grim helped to design. I asked him to sign the box for me, and he was glad to do so.. One of my NY gunning partners calls them Old Man Decoys, cuz they are so light and easy to carry.

Adam told me they are not just for Old Men, and that if you can find the first ones produced, they work in all conditions, big water and small. I can attest to them working in the marsh, but my box of Mallard decoys will remain unopened, at least for a while yet.


I wish you well. May you have a safe and enjoyable season.

Best regards
Vince











"Art does not reproduce what is visible - but makes things visible." ~ Paul Klee, artist, 1920
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Re: Decoy bags... In reply to
My first duck hunting related project was sewing up decoys bags, with the extensive help of my mom, back in 2013. We made the pocket size large enough to accommodate a Big Foot Brand Canada Goose floater, which means each pocket fits about a 6-10 plastic duck decoys. We made a 4 slot and a 6 slot bag out of extra canvas she had and double/triple stitched most seams. They have solid bottoms and really soak up water, which takes a long time to dry out in my unheated garage. They aren't perfect but I really like that we made them together and they see regular use each season.

Now that I'm making progress on my hand carved rig I've been looking into making individual slotted bags. I think drainage will be important in the next design but haven't seriously researched a mesh bottom material, and would would like to find a more water resistant material for the bulk of the bag.

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Re: Decoy bags... In reply to
I'm trying to figure out, in my head, the pieces/part sequence. I'm thinking, start with the middle partition, (I want to sew in anchor pockets, so I'll sew them in first), then the individual partitions, back to back, so I'll have to pin them to the middle part first, then attach the bottom to both the middle and individual parts, then add the sides and ends. In my head it works...

I'm thinking about using some fine mesh decoy bag material for the bottoms.

In a while, I'll try and see what happens...

Jon

"Each decoy you touch holds memories of, past, present and God Willing, future hunts. The places, birds, men, boats, dogs and days you spent doing what you so dearly love and enjoy"- Vince Pagliaorli
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Re: Decoy bags... In reply to
One of the features in decoy bags that I find important is padding. Individual, partitioned slots are a PITA in this respect. In most standard bags, I can cut 2 strips of camping pad to work under the partitions, and it stays in place well. In individual slotted bags, I cut all the pieces, but they always move and are not in the bottom when I go to pick up. We always crush the empty bags down, and the pads move. To me the padding is more important to me than the weight slots. I use H-weights, and as long as I hitch them off close to the decoy, they do not slide under the partitions and tangle, and don't bang against the pretty sides of the decoys.

Another feature I prefer is a stiff bag. I like bags that will stand up before it is full of decoys.

Dave Diefenderfer
Manassas, VA

"Once you set out to build a boat, throw away your square. And if you work on her after she's launched, throw away your level." author unknown