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What's on the bench? November 2018

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What's on the bench? November 2018
I can't believe I am first this month!





Dave Diefenderfer
Manassas, VA

"Once you set out to build a boat, throw away your square. And if you work on her after she's launched, throw away your level." author unknown

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Re: What's on the bench? November 2018 In reply to
Dave,
Nice looking flock of divers. Homers?

Zane
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Re: What's on the bench? November 2018 In reply to
. Homers?

Yes, Zane, these are Homers. Following Steve's paint schedules, as best I can. RH hens are partially painted, then I have some Buffies next, that are from Bob Romstadt. Have not taken a count, but thinking I am close to 50-50 in the spread, decoys I assembled and painted vs purchased. No longer have and plastics in my spread. Still have the Gadwalls coated and primed, scared to tackle the paint still!

Dave Diefenderfer
Manassas, VA

"Once you set out to build a boat, throw away your square. And if you work on her after she's launched, throw away your level." author unknown

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Re: What's on the bench? November 2018 In reply to
Good morning, Dave~


Great job! Those newer heads (Bob Mitchell?) on the Cans are sweet.


BTW: Bring a pair of primed Grey Ducks on your way north - we can knock out a pair in an hour or two....


All the best,


SJS

Steven Jay Sanford
Pencil Brook Farm
South Cambridge, NY
http://www.stevenjaysanford.com


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Re: What's on the bench? November 2018 In reply to
Steve, I will get an early start in the morning so we have plenty of time for a painting class!

I agree , really like the new Can heads, much improved.

Dave Diefenderfer
Manassas, VA

"Once you set out to build a boat, throw away your square. And if you work on her after she's launched, throw away your level." author unknown

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Re: What's on the bench? November 2018 In reply to
Good morning, Dave~


Sounds good!


Here are some more from The Bench of George Williams:






A drake of a different color.....






Rig mates?








All the best,


SJS

Steven Jay Sanford
Pencil Brook Farm
South Cambridge, NY
http://www.stevenjaysanford.com


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Re: What's on the bench? November 2018 In reply to
Hollowed white cedar and oils, simple gunning






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Re: What's on the bench? November 2018 In reply to
Couple canvas birds--one finished & one in the works.
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Re: What's on the bench? November 2018 In reply to
Paul, that is a pretty snappy looking canvas hairyhead!! Ya done good, fella!Wink
george@runamuckdecoys.com
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Re: What's on the bench? November 2018 In reply to


I am putting together some low head Broadbills. Think I have enough materials for 15 or 16


Joe
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Re: What's on the bench? November 2018 In reply to
Paul~


Wow! That's one stylish Shelldrake.


All the best,


SJS

Steven Jay Sanford
Pencil Brook Farm
South Cambridge, NY
http://www.stevenjaysanford.com


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Re: What's on the bench? November 2018 In reply to
Joe~


Another great one! That ol' Broadie-beak sure looks comfortable.


All the best,


SJS

Steven Jay Sanford
Pencil Brook Farm
South Cambridge, NY
http://www.stevenjaysanford.com


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Re: What's on the bench? November 2018 In reply to
I initially thought the heads was a bit too large for the bodies but now I think it is ok. I have about 60 Al McCormick decoys of which 6 are sleepers. Last year I added 17 Broadbills with standard heads and this body. Figured that I could change it up for a more realistic spread and thought it was time for some snuggle heads.

Joe
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Re: What's on the bench? November 2018 In reply to
Good morning, Joe~


The proportions look perfect to my eye.


I'm rehabbing some Brant. These are Herter's Model 92 bodies with Autumn Wings Goose heads - a nice combination.






But, the customer wants them repaired and looking a bit more like Brant. The bottoms still need paint.







I shortened each bill - but did not need to reshape the heads.






I'll post a full step-by-step when I have more time. I "rebuilt" the head to body arrangement. The foam bodies notoriously compress and collapse with the strains from handling. Epoxy and 3M 5200 to the rescue.....


I also "restored" this Wildfowler balsa Black Duck that I bought at the SSWA Duckboat Show.







He got sealed with spar varnish and flat oils before a topcoat of latex.






I protected but highlighted the Quogue Wildfowler brand.






And I scratch-painted the face.






Again, a full step-by-step will appear someday.


All the best,


SJS

Steven Jay Sanford
Pencil Brook Farm
South Cambridge, NY
http://www.stevenjaysanford.com


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Re: What's on the bench? November 2018 In reply to
Steve

Good job on the Brant, but I really like the high head Wildfowler Black. Are you gonna gun over it?


Best regards
VP











"Art does not reproduce what is visible - but makes things visible." ~ Paul Klee, artist, 1920
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Re: What's on the bench? November 2018 In reply to
George,

Appreciate the comment! Thanks for the paint schedule and for holding my hand during the painting process.

Steve,

Thank you for the kind words!

Paul
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Re: What's on the bench? November 2018 In reply to
Good morning, Vince~


Yes - I treated this bird as a gunner - and not just a shelf-rider. I rehabbed 3 Wildfowler Mallards earlier - and have shot a bird over them. So, I have the beginnings of a nice little "all Wildfowler" rig.


All the best,


SJS

Steven Jay Sanford
Pencil Brook Farm
South Cambridge, NY
http://www.stevenjaysanford.com


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Re: What's on the bench? November 2018 In reply to
Steve -

That is a wonderful thing that your doing with those Wildfowlers, getting them back in service where they belong. I can just imagine the satisfaction it brings to gun over them.



Over the years I have had some Wildfowlers pass through my hands, and on to others. I now wish that I had rehabbed at least five of the balsa Black Ducks to gun over. For some reason I just cannot bring myself to mess with old decoys. It is good that you do not struggle with that. You do the decoys justice.

Before it is to late. I'd like to gun over some of the old, and the newer Blacks by other carvers in my care, at least once. They deserve that. May have to get me a larger duck boat again


Best regards
VP











"Art does not reproduce what is visible - but makes things visible." ~ Paul Klee, artist, 1920
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Re: What's on the bench? November 2018 In reply to
Vince~


I do struggle with the decision to paint vintage birds. My inclination to "refurbish" or simply "maintain" gear to keep it going is powerful. So, I do NOT purchase original paint decoys unless I feel that they are so far gone that they've lost most of their collectible value. (It helps that my pocket book cannot handle most of the original paint decoys that catch my eye....) I shop only for those that can be painted without harm.


In the same vein, I always make certain that customers are aware of the "risk" they take when they ask me to re-paint older Beans or McCormicks. Thus far, I have seen no marketplace need to preserve the original paint on most Herter's - at least not their Tenite or Durlon birds.


I also struggle with aesthetic decisions when putting my brushes to these Wildfowlers. Sometimes, I give them the "standard" Steve Sanford gunner paint job. Other times - as with this highhead Black - I try to put myself in the shoes of just another piece-work painter hired by Wildfowlers in Old Saybrook or Quogue back in the day - and I imagine how they might approach the task. As you observed so kindly, I strive to do them "justice" and to honor the original makers.



Sometimes, I take more of a true "restoration" approach - removing or covering the non-Wildfowler paint of others and seeking a bird that looks like it's in original paint, albeit with some wear. I have not returned such birds to the open marketplace; they reside with close friends or on my own shelves.


The paint on this 1960s Mallard had been completely "re-imagined" (by a gunner's wife) and so I tried to put it back where it might have been had it lived a simpler life of hard work in its original attire.






This is my first highhead Black Duck. It had just a bit of "in-use" re-paint, but hastily done. Fortunately, the face and bill were still in fine shape. It had so much original paint that I simply would not re-seal, re-prime and re-paint for gunning use. So, I tried to erase the effects of the later paint and I waxed it so it can adorn my shop.







The care and use of vintage gunning stool is an interesting topic; I want to write a longer piece someday. In the meantime, I think I do need at least one more beat up old Wildfowler Black that I could prepare for the hunt.


All the best,


SJS

















Steven Jay Sanford
Pencil Brook Farm
South Cambridge, NY
http://www.stevenjaysanford.com


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Re: What's on the bench? November 2018 In reply to
Best way to deal with rehab is to take it to maker for the work. In lieu of that, , rather than scrap of shelve older birds, it is always a good rule of thumb to try to rehab, or send stuff out to someone who can do it-bring the decoy back to a state of usability.
I do not like touching stuff that is not of my making, and if folks insist on me doing rehab, they know up front that the decoys are now repaints, BUT are reconditioned to be again functional tools.
Like you, Steve, I have been mucking about with a file of colors for folks who want to rehab their old stuff.
At least, for non-painters, it gives them an idea of what they need to get their stool back to shipshape order.It's always great for us dinosaurs to mentor new folks, so this process never disappears.Wink
george@runamuckdecoys.com
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a couple more ladies done today.... In reply to
Bob Romstadt bodies and heads. Bob and I have been doing some trades for raw bodies and heads. The Ruddies I did a few months ago where his heads and my modified coot bodies. These are heads and bodies by Bob. I like this body and will try a teal with it next, with a different head.

Dave Diefenderfer
Manassas, VA

"Once you set out to build a boat, throw away your square. And if you work on her after she's launched, throw away your level." author unknown

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Re: What's on the bench? November 2018 In reply to
Steve -


I like the high head Mallard, as well as the high head Black decoy. They are not easy decoys to find, and you did do them justice. I enjoyed reading your explanation of your work process. There are always lessons to learn from other artists & carvers that are willing to share.


Most of my Wildfowlers were acquired in the 1980's, when prices were within my reach. It took me a long time to find a high head, hollow pine, Old Saybrook Black Duck in OP, but I did finally. Other decoys I bartered/traded for.




This Old Saybrook, balsa, drake Mallard is the first OP Wildfowler I acquired for a very good price.






This repainted balsa, Blue Bill, the first OS Wildfowler in my care. The decoy came from a large rig of Wildfowlers. Yup, that is Pigeon Poop that ate through the paint.





A OP balsa Old Saybrook Can






A OP balsa, Point Pleasant, oversize Brant




Mighty fine old factory decoys they are IMO.


Best regards

Vince











"Art does not reproduce what is visible - but makes things visible." ~ Paul Klee, artist, 1920
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Re: What's on the bench? November 2018 In reply to
(size 4) Painting mallards and mulching up lots of leaves.






MLBob

"Art is like an ill-trained Labrador retriever that drags you out into traffic." (Annie Dillard)

....Here's to Joe Wooster, who made me realize that the useful could and should be beautiful; and who firmly believed that decoy carvers were the last free men in America.

https://www.facebook.com/KOOIdecoy?ref=hl

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Re: What's on the bench? November 2018 In reply to