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What's on your workbench ? MARCH

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Re: What's on your workbench ? MARCH In reply to
Good morning, J~


Clever idea - well executed ! (Does the dogbone "bait" in other Labradors ?)


I just re-furbished a Wildfowler Canvasback given to me at the LI Decoy Collectors Show. It's a balsa-bodied Superior model. The head was loose and it was missing an eye - and it had been repainted. So, I felt free to have my way with it (with no loss of collectible value).








The head just needed some glue and some overnight clamping. And I replaced both eyes. The original remaing eye was amber but the bird now flashes pinpoint pupils and red irises.



Note how I have blocked out the areas of major color and reduced the amount of black on the ends of the body. Among his close relatives (the pochards, genus Aythya), the Can shows the least dark fore and aft. But, the face is much darker than the rest of the head.







The paint is pure Sanford gunner. I did not try to replicate the original paint job - mostly because Wildfowler commonly used an air brush. I'm strictly a "bristle" brush guy. The light areas on the body are stippled with 2 Greys and a White over a light Grey base - trying to get that heavy canvas look.


I painted in the primaries and tail feathers as an homage to the original - but in my own style. I would not normally put these in on a diving duck gunner.







I topcoat my gunner bills with satin spar varnish to give a bit more protection to the paint - and a bit of eye appeal.







The bottom has been lightly sanded - very carefully around the Quogue, LI , NY seal - and coated with satin spar varnish, too.








Not sure what lies ahead for Mister Canvasback. He'll probably ride a shelf as I (sadly) do not live or hunt near his haunts.


All the best,


SJS







Steven Jay Sanford
Pencil Brook Farm
South Cambridge, NY
http://www.stevenjaysanford.com


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Re: What's on your workbench ? MARCH In reply to
Terrific job as usual, Steve!

I really like the smooth lines and the overall silhouette of that toy duck. I'll bet he will look just gorgeous on the water, especially in a light chop!

I think perhaps, you may have to send him my way next fall, so he can get a little "water time"... (hint, hint)...

(While Cans occasionally pass thru our area, we don't really see an abundance of them around here. I just think would look good and happy bobbing around with the rest of my play ducks!).

Jon

"Each decoy you touch holds memories of, past, present and God Willing, future hunts. The places, birds, men, boats, dogs and days you spent doing what you so dearly love and enjoy"- Vince Pagliaorli
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Re: What's on your workbench ? MARCH In reply to



The reference photo: Courtesy of Larry Eckart, taken several years ago off Tawas. When I read or hear the term apple head applied to a redhead decoy, these are the poses that immediately come to mind... If you look in the center of the photo, the puffy head drinker pose is evident. The preener, in more simplified form is evident, as well as a hen redhead that is quite striking, laying with her head well back across the length of her body.

Last edited by:

RLLigman: Mar 14, 2019, 5:27 AM
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Re: What's on your workbench ? MARCH In reply to
Good morning, Ric (and Larry) ~


I think that Hen is reaching for her oil gland. Great postures all around.



But...it looks to me like Larry's got his decoys rigged way too close together!!!!


All the best to you both,


SJS

Steven Jay Sanford
Pencil Brook Farm
South Cambridge, NY
http://www.stevenjaysanford.com


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Re: What's on your workbench ? MARCH In reply to
He posted a string of photos of several rafts resting birds, many in a variety of interesting poses; all in focus.

You found that shot! I have never seen a duck invert its head to do that...


From what I recall of that original post, Larry took these in late November-early December, over a holiday visit. For a carver, they are great reference photos of one of my favorite birds to hunt, as well as observe!

Last edited by:

RLLigman: Mar 14, 2019, 4:59 AM
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Re: What's on your workbench ? MARCH In reply to
I love it does it self right?
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Re: What's on your workbench ? MARCH In reply to
I'm wondering if it takes hand signals.....


SJS

Steven Jay Sanford
Pencil Brook Farm
South Cambridge, NY
http://www.stevenjaysanford.com


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Re: What's on your workbench ? MARCH In reply to
Some folks is just betta' at pitchin', than they is at catchin'- Leroy "Satchel" Paige
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Re: What's on your workbench ? MARCH In reply to
It will usually go where you want it to, but doesn't always come back. The best part is that it doesn't whine, shed or poop. I am considering making another to see if I can breed them. Puppies would stay without breaking.
Red heads are nice.
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Re: What's on your workbench ? MARCH In reply to
 
This month keeps on rolling along with plenty of good work.




Not on the bench, but shaping up in the vice. Not ready for eyes just yet, more work to do.

Another drake Wood Duck, hollow white pine and sugar pine, to add to the rig.















"Art does not reproduce what is visible - but makes things visible." ~ Paul Klee, artist, 1920
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Re: What's on your workbench ? MARCH In reply to
Beginning to see the connection between the watercolors and the stool, Vince.
A funky cutie in the making. Man, that is one I wanna see floating!
george@runamuckdecoys.com
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Re: What's on your workbench ? MARCH In reply to
I think your Woodies are my favorites that you make Vince. So much life to them.

Heres a first, 20 years carving and still making stuff for the first time.



----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I never know which is worse: the sorrow when you hit the bird, or the shame when you miss.
http://www.hillmandecoys.com
Mullica Hill NJ

Last edited by:

jode hillman: Mar 15, 2019, 5:29 AM
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Re: What's on your workbench ? MARCH In reply to
I didn't get much done after installing the replacement switch and blower control in my dust collector, just this bird and another started in rough-out phase. We are in the process of transiting from 34" of standing snow cover, the result of the 215" or so snowfall YTD, to 24" of hard icey snow. Secondary roads are skating rinks, with water pooling everywhere until the frost cap is pierced. I spent the day clearing eave troughs, and cutting snow back to enable the sun to "work" on diminishing the remainder of snow on the roof.

This is the last unique redhead pose I am carving; with the remaining seven copies of previous poses. I had to add a piece of cork via an epoxy patch because this body was cut from the end stock of the cork sheet. Out of five sheets, I squeezed these thirty-four birds out of three sheets and some scrap cork pieces too large to burn. This head pose is generally what I envision as a standard redhead drake. I have a second drake and hen in this pose still to go...

Last edited by:

RLLigman: Mar 15, 2019, 5:55 AM
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Re: What's on your workbench ? MARCH In reply to
 
Decoy Monster Machine -


Thank you.

I cut the body out last year, before I did the recent painting, or it would have had the high back.

The slim body, like a canoe, is cuz it's made for river, and stream use. I can't wait to see it where it belongs as well.


As for the Funky...

You can take the man outta Farrell, PA but you can't take Farrell, PA outta the man.


"We need the funk. We gotta have that funk..." - George Clinton Parliament Funkadelic - We Want The Funk



Best regards
Vince











"Art does not reproduce what is visible - but makes things visible." ~ Paul Klee, artist, 1920
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Re: What's on your workbench ? MARCH In reply to
 
Jode -


Your pair of Eurasian Wigeon are Kick A$$! Man they look GOOD. Lotta style & color.

It is always good to add new creations to your accomplishments, keeps the artistic juice flowing.




Thanks for the kind words.

Wood Ducks & Teal have always been favorites. So I always go back to them, no matter what else I carve or make.



Best regards
Vince











"Art does not reproduce what is visible - but makes things visible." ~ Paul Klee, artist, 1920
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Re: What's on your workbench ? MARCH In reply to
RLLigman,

Those redheads are stellar! Love the attitude. How do the raised cork feathers fair from season to season? Maybe I am too rough on my blocks, but I would think those would get beat up. Do you add some strength with epoxy or something else?

Either way, they are blocks I would love to hunt over.

Brad
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Re: What's on your workbench ? MARCH In reply to
Brad, thanks for the compliment! My black cork decoys carved with raised primaries don't hold-up well, despite being treated with thinned gel epoxy that penetrates and strengthens them. IF I can find the chunk I broke off, I add an epoxy coated dowel to pin it pack in place and reinforce it. Tan cork, once treated with two coats of sealer is quite strong and resilient. Almost all the birds I carve with raised and crossed primary feathers also have elevated tail boards, lending them some additional degree of protection from errant foot placement, man and dog! I damage the tips and then just regrind them to cross at a point.


The top photo contains some birds I carved back in 2013, all of whom have survived, with some minor bill and head crown wear. I carved the wings and cape feather groups in a more stylized fashion to enable them to shed water a little better and not ice up as quickly in a late season chop, since they ride so low.

Note in the lower photo that several of these semi-alert birds have crossed primaries, only one of them fully crossed with tips extended, but all with lowered tails indicating they are alert and moving to avoid a threat.


My painting goals for these blocks are to avoid the monochromatic head color and to add the vermiculation in a way that suggests feather blocks, rather than just random combing.

Last edited by:

RLLigman: Mar 16, 2019, 4:58 AM
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Re: What's on your workbench ? MARCH In reply to


Our extended melt continues, so I had ample time to grind out another two redheads. I reinforced the bill on the first bird with an epoxy coated finishing nail. This head stock (southern Michigan sourced) is oddly soft and fuzzy, beyond being cut incorrectly to be sold as head stock by the vendor, when compared to the Wisconsin basswood I now use from Heinecke Wood Products. The bandsaw "wandered" into the cheek on the visible side of the head, necessitating the epoxy repair.

Last edited by:

RLLigman: Mar 17, 2019, 6:03 AM
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Re: What's on your workbench ? MARCH In reply to
Rick,

Usually pick up my bass from a local source, but when they were short on the stock thicknesses I wanted for carving wings on deadmounts, I sent off to Heineke and they cut me blocks to size. Impressed with the quality and the friendly treatment. When I placed my order and asked if they wanted a credit card number, I was told that wasn't necessary. Order was shipped and invoice sent out later with prices as quoted, and they went out of their way to keep packaging dimensions to a minimum for UPS. Not too many places willing to do business that way anymore. Good to know they're available.


MLBob

"Art is like an ill-trained Labrador retriever that drags you out into traffic." (Annie Dillard)

....Here's to Joe Wooster, who made me realize that the useful could and should be beautiful; and who firmly believed that decoy carvers were the last free men in America.

https://www.facebook.com/KOOIdecoy?ref=hl

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Re: What's on your workbench ? MARCH In reply to
A few more Broadbill done....





Dave Diefenderfer
Manassas, VA

"Once you set out to build a boat, throw away your square. And if you work on her after she's launched, throw away your level." author unknown

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Re: What's on your workbench ? MARCH In reply to
Your story is an exact match to the one I was offered originally that motivated me to switch to them as a wood source. Their basswood is a littler "tighter" than what I was buying. I can see why so many carvers use them as their exclusive wood source. Now...if I can only find a replacement for my soon to be non-existent supply of Val-Oil! Looking at a penetrating/sealing oil used in the Marine industry for wooden decks as a potential replacement.

Bob, you should at least get a chuckle out of this: when MSU was down thirteen points to Michigan yesterday, I ran a search and your Facebook site came up on the first page of results. I entered to view the current photos, which is essentially all I can do as a non-member. While viewing the wing gouging and feather group carving photos, I was admiring the quality of the wood you had for base stock, particularly in the close-up shots- nice wood; better skill and technique!! Your fourth bird in that sequence will be a "stunner"! Are you modifying Godin's wing layout patterns, or simply drawing them up from scratch?

We should start a Go Fund Me page for funds to purchase a S X S with percussion triggers for the base of that pintail display. Dave had a very good idea to suggest that as an addition to complete it!
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Re: What's on your workbench ? MARCH In reply to


Brad, here is another primary feather position that is an option. To me, this signifies an alert bird. The only down-side of this position is that water pools and freezes in the "well" between the primaries

Last edited by:

RLLigman: Mar 18, 2019, 4:12 AM
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Re: What's on your workbench ? MARCH In reply to
Rick,

Thanks for the extra photos and explanation.

Brad
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Re: What's on your workbench ? MARCH In reply to
Good morning, All~


More from The Bench of George Williams....






Apparently all migrated west to Ohio....






Not sure how "Obi" arrived...via broomstick?????






All the best,


SJS


Steven Jay Sanford
Pencil Brook Farm
South Cambridge, NY
http://www.stevenjaysanford.com


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Re: What's on your workbench ? MARCH In reply to
Rick,

I doubt we'll ever see a "replacement" for Val-Oil. Mine is holding out OK. My hope is that I might deplete my stockpile at the same time I don't have the hand strength to carve anymore. That would be perfect timing Crazy.

The patterns for wings (as for each bird) come from scratch drawings. With a basic knowledge of what happens with the feather groupings where the wings connect & how they layer & fold, it's not too hard to figure out what should happen. A good supply of wings saved in the freezer each season for use with dummies while dog training also comes in handy, as they go a long way toward answering questions about the structure of wings on a deadmount, as well as and the various contours that can be incorporated to make them look effective. I'm finding that the biggest challenge is deciding which details to include and which to leave out, so that the viewer uses his imagination.

Just turned up the heat and will be headed out to paint as soon as the studio has had time to warm up a bit.





MLBob

"Art is like an ill-trained Labrador retriever that drags you out into traffic." (Annie Dillard)

....Here's to Joe Wooster, who made me realize that the useful could and should be beautiful; and who firmly believed that decoy carvers were the last free men in America.

https://www.facebook.com/KOOIdecoy?ref=hl