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Need some tire/rim education please

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Need some tire/rim education please
So, I have inherited Steve's little travel trailer. 24 ft and it is the one we used the first year we were in MT and we used it as turkey and quail camp a few times. The problem is there is no spare tire and last turkey season we blew one of the tires bringing it back here to my house at the end of the season. Spectacularly blew it. So, I would like to have a spare for the trailer.

A perhaps not so much of a problem, other than potential jerkwad problem, is that someone either lost their spare tire or dumped it in my ditch in front of my house. I am leaning towards giving the benefit of the doubt since the rim does not look too bad and the rubber is still useable as a tire and it is still inflated. Buuuut finders keepers.

Sooooooo knowing nothing about tire and rim interchangeability or even what to begin searching for in keywords, I figured I would come here for some help. Here are the pictures with the tire numbers for the found spare and a tire on the trailer.





R14 is on the trailer currently and D14 is on the found spare. Can I use the found rim and put an R14 tire on it? What do the R and D codes mean?

Is there a tires for dummies sort of link that can help me understand tires so I know what I am looking for when I go to get some?

Thanks

Dani

Last edited by:

Dani: Feb 12, 2020, 2:54 PM
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Re: Need some tire/rim education please In reply to
R is radial, D is a bias ply tire. Biggest thing to check for is load rating. You wouldn't want to put too small of a load rating on a bigger trailer
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Re: Need some tire/rim education please In reply to
Dani,

It would appear that the trailer rims and the "found" spare rim would be the same diameter. The bolt pattern may or may not interchange. Easiest way to check is to actually see if the "found" spare rim will bolt up to the trailer axel.

Please do a bit of research on DATE codes (link) I suspect ALL the tires are "out of date" for recommended tire service life. The tires should be no more than 6 years old. Even with tread left, the rubber compounds break down and tires just are not safe to run past the 6 year service life. Yep probably plenty out there on the road, but do your self a favor and check the date of manufacture.

Keeping "fresh" tires on the road will save you many headaches not to mention the safety factor if a tire blows at speed.

Take care, Huntindave McCann Smile SHELL ROCK IA. ,,,,,, "As sailors grow older, the wiser ones move to smaller boats." Thomas Firth Jones, Multihull Voyaging
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Re: Need some tire/rim education please In reply to
Thanks Kyle.

Dave, I checked the date on the trailer tires and they are five years old. I will be keeping an eye out for sales on tires.

The spare and the trailer are all five lug rims. I will need to jack the trailer up to verify the found rim will fit but it at least has the same number holes as I have lugs.
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Re: Need some tire/rim education please In reply to
Dani,
When you jack up the trailer, grab each tire and try to wiggle it side to side. If a tire is loose the bearing may be shot and need to be replaced.


Pete


MOLON LABE [mo 'lon la 've]

Technology has it's place, hunting isn't it.

Life's a blink, never have to say ....... "I should have"!

"That human optimism & goodness that we put our faith in, is in no more danger than the stars in the jaws of the clouds." .................Victor Hugo
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Re: Need some tire/rim education please In reply to
Always wise particularly on a trailer to go up a load rating if available in your tire size. Will extend tire life longer but may ride a little firmer. If you don't want to jack up trailer measure between center of wheel studs to see if pattern matches yours.
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Re: Need some tire/rim education please In reply to
Dani wrote:
So, I have inherited Steve's little travel trailer. 24 ft and it is the one we used the first year we were in MT and we used it as turkey and quail camp a few times. The problem is there is no spare tire and last turkey season we blew one of the tires bringing it back here to my house at the end of the season. Spectacularly blew it. So, I would like to have a spare for the trailer.

A perhaps not so much of a problem, other than potential jerkwad problem, is that someone either lost their spare tire or dumped it in my ditch in front of my house. I am leaning towards giving the benefit of the doubt since the rim does not look too bad and the rubber is still useable as a tire and it is still inflated. Buuuut finders keepers.

Sooooooo knowing nothing about tire and rim interchangeability or even what to begin searching for in keywords, I figured I would come here for some help. Here are the pictures with the tire numbers for the found spare and a tire on the trailer.

[img]https://photos.smugmug.com/photos/i-Pp3S8BV/0/70963958/X2/i-Pp3S8BV-X2.jpg[/img]

[img]https://photos.smugmug.com/photos/i-Ps3kxcZ/0/847bbab8/X2/i-Ps3kxcZ-X2.jpg[/img]

R14 is on the trailer currently and D14 is on the found spare. Can I use the found rim and put an R14 tire on it? What do the R and D codes mean?

Is there a tires for dummies sort of link that can help me understand tires so I know what I am looking for when I go to get some?

Thanks

Dani


Hi Dani,

You have gotten some info. Since it's a travel trailer I'd look for something like these.

https://www.etrailer.com/...year/724864519A.html

The reason I say this is these are designed for travel trailers, stock trailers...etc. These are 8 ply tires which have a much stronger side wall. Chances are if you were to go to your local Walmart you won't find any one that thinks to ask questions and you'll get 4 ply car tires. Also I'll suggest getting some tire covers. The sun does a number on tires and shielding them from the sun will greatly extend the life of your tires.


Take care,

Ed L.
East Moline,
Illinois
_________________________________________
If I'd had asked what they wanted they would have said faster horses" - Henry Ford

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Re: Need some tire/rim education please In reply to
I believe our camper has Carlisles we got from Pep Boys at a fairly good price. But I will check this weekend to make sure.


Carl
Mobile, AL
DHBP Member since 1998

"Life is too short to drink bad beer."
Disclaimer: This post and/or report is not a substantiation of or reflection on the true accuracy of the present surveying methods. It is only a report on or comment concerning local observation and/or results. Your results and observation may vary based on your location, local water conditions, food supply, weather conditions and migratory patterns "
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Re: Need some tire/rim education please In reply to
Definitely get trailer service rated tires that are rated for At least the maximum load on your trailer. For a single tire I would buy from a local tire dealer, they can always order one if they don?t have it in stock and you would have it in a couple days.

The last set of tires I purchased were from Tirerack dot com. I ordered four tires mounted on new rims that were delivered by UPS. I just had to install them on my trailer and the cost was only a few dollars more than just the tires ( free shipping). If you go that route you will need to know the hole pattern for the rim ( there are guides online on how the measure this).


Great South Bay
West Sayville, N Y
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Re: Need some tire/rim education please In reply to
Don?t know if this is what you are looking for. The 14 refers to the rim size and can?t be changed. The other. numbers refer to with of the tire in mm and the ratio of the tire height to width. You can sometimes juggle tires around that are the same umbers but you will want them to be the same overall height.

https://www.consumerreports.org/...other-data/index.htm

https://www.caranddriver.com/...ead-a-tire-sidewall/

https://www.tireindustry.org/reading-tire-sidewall

Mark
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Re: Need some tire/rim education please In reply to
Thanks a lot y'all. You guys have really helped me out.

I'll check this weekend to be sure the rim fits the trailer and I'll check out the bearings.

I wanna get this badboy ready for turkey season so I have a month to get finished with all of my stuff.
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Re: Need some tire/rim education please In reply to
what are you towing with? if it is the trailer that I'm thinking of, it has to be 6000K GVWR.
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Re: Need some tire/rim education please In reply to
Tod,

I bought Steve's 2018 Chevy 2500HD Silverado so I am not worried about being under powered vehicle wise. I definitely would be if I were using the FJCruiser (which is now pushing 230,000 miles...gotta love toyotas).

The trailer is a 24' Coachmen Shasta and I think you're right about the about 6K GVWR.

Dani

Last edited by:

Dani: Feb 14, 2020, 9:19 AM
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Re: Need some tire/rim education please In reply to
Well, no question you are good there in that case with the 3/4 ton. I was wondering about the FJ, it may be rated for close to the trailer weight, but iffy. Great!

For tires, you have got a lot of good info. The thing I'll say about camper tires is that I'll never run ST tires and use LT tires. LT tires are better built and hold up better. Some will say that ST tires are specially designed for trailer's needs, I say that they are specially designed to be cheap. Spend time on a camper forum and you will see blow out after blow out of ST tires. Running gravel for any length of time an LT tire will shine with it greater cut resistance. It can be a little tougher to find LTs with the proper specs, but it is worth it in my opinion. When I upgraded to LTs, I had to buy new wheels, but mine were looking a little ragged anyway and the price is pretty minimal.

Wheels vary in: 1) diameter, 2) bolt pattern AND (not mentioned) 3) width. Looking at tire specs there will be a range of width wheels that are OK, so something to check too. If you want some help thinking about LT tires, let me know. If you aren't going to tow much, I'd just get STs, but if I was going to do some longer trips, think about it.
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Re: Need some tire/rim education please In reply to
That's interesting Tod about the ST vs LT and something I am interested in exploring for the trailer.

It will be tougher and I may need to stay closer to home (not going to MT every year but maybe trips to KS or NE or SD or OK most years) but I do want to continue to travel for bird hunting. The it will be tougher part is that I only earn three weeks of vacation a year (and not all at once) and I will now need to worry about travel time on both ends of my trip. That wasn't something I had to worry about when Steve was alive. If having better tires on the trailer will save me a load of headaches later, then I am all for that.
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Re: Need some tire/rim education please In reply to
That's interesting Tod. I hadn't heard that before about st vs lt tires for trailers. I appreciate your knowledge and experience on the subject, but it really goes against what I'm seeing from other sources like
https://m.tirerack.com/...hpage.jsp?techid=219

Not doubting your conclusions but guess I need to do more investigating for my own edification.


Pete


MOLON LABE [mo 'lon la 've]

Technology has it's place, hunting isn't it.

Life's a blink, never have to say ....... "I should have"!

"That human optimism & goodness that we put our faith in, is in no more danger than the stars in the jaws of the clouds." .................Victor Hugo
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Re: Need some tire/rim education please In reply to
Pete,

If I'm reading that correctly, it isn't saying that the LT tires are inferior to the ST tires. It's saying that the P rated tires are inferior for towing purposes. P would be passenger rated for like cars? Am I reading the article correctly?

Last edited by:

Dani: Feb 14, 2020, 12:55 PM
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Re: Need some tire/rim education please In reply to
Pete McMiller wrote:
That's interesting Tod. I hadn't heard that before about st vs lt tires for trailers. I appreciate your knowledge and experience on the subject, but it really goes against what I'm seeing from other sources like
https://m.tirerack.com/...hpage.jsp?techid=219

Not doubting your conclusions but guess I need to do more investigating for my own edification.


The industry is trying to sell cheaply made tires that have a larger markup for trailers. Look at the weight of an ST vs an LT size for size - there is a lot more rubber in an LT. Look at the speed ratings of and ST, much lower than an LT. Hang out at an active RV forum and watch the reports of ST failures roll in. LTs have a LOT more tread and last longer.
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Re: Need some tire/rim education please In reply to
Yes, I think you're reading that right. This is new to me so I'm learning also.


Pete


MOLON LABE [mo 'lon la 've]

Technology has it's place, hunting isn't it.

Life's a blink, never have to say ....... "I should have"!

"That human optimism & goodness that we put our faith in, is in no more danger than the stars in the jaws of the clouds." .................Victor Hugo
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Re: Need some tire/rim education please In reply to
Dani wrote:
Pete,

If I'm reading that correctly, it isn't saying that the LT tires are inferior to the ST tires. It's saying that the P rated tires are inferior for towing purposes. P would be passenger rated for like cars? Am I reading the article correctly?


LTs come standard on some campers. I've never heard of P rated tire on a camper and generally it is recommended against to use a P rated.

Finding an appropriate LT is often tough, I spent the last 20 minutes looking for a good substitution for you in an LT adn didn't find one. Usually you need to tweak the size slightly to get one to fit, keeping load capacity in mind.
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Re: Need some tire/rim education please In reply to
I have seen the reports of trailer tire failures and until your post didn't consider the LTs as a viable replacement. - I will now. My trailer is 2 1/2 years old and has about 12-13,000 miles on these tires. I'll file this discussion in my memory bank for future use. Thanks.


Pete


MOLON LABE [mo 'lon la 've]

Technology has it's place, hunting isn't it.

Life's a blink, never have to say ....... "I should have"!

"That human optimism & goodness that we put our faith in, is in no more danger than the stars in the jaws of the clouds." .................Victor Hugo
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Re: Need some tire/rim education please In reply to
So, another question that I'm sure you have evaluated - what's your feeling on the stiffer sidewall on an ST vs LT to lesson the potential for sway? Is it important?


Pete


MOLON LABE [mo 'lon la 've]

Technology has it's place, hunting isn't it.

Life's a blink, never have to say ....... "I should have"!

"That human optimism & goodness that we put our faith in, is in no more danger than the stars in the jaws of the clouds." .................Victor Hugo
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Re: Need some tire/rim education please In reply to
Pete McMiller wrote:
So, another question that I'm sure you have evaluated - what's your feeling on the stiffer sidewall on an ST vs LT to lesson the potential for sway? Is it important?


I?m not convinced that STs actually have a stiffer sidewall. For the tires I?ve owned, I?d say they don?t. They have a stiffer sidewall than a P rated tire, but I don?t think more stiffness than a comparable LT. Think about the forces on a trailer tire being towed behind vs a front tire of a pickup turning at speed, no comparison as far as need for stiff sidewall. This goes back to weight and why an LT is heavier.

As far as sway, I haven?t seen it or heard negative reports with LTs.
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Re: Need some tire/rim education please In reply to
tod osier wrote:
The industry is trying to sell cheaply made tires that have a larger markup for trailers. Look at the weight of an ST vs an LT size for size - there is a lot more rubber in an LT. Look at the speed ratings of and ST, much lower than an LT. Hang out at an active RV forum and watch the reports of ST failures roll in. LTs have a LOT more tread and last longer.


I'm glad you shared this because I am about to buy yet another tire for my car hauler because of an ST failure. I have gone though at least 6 tires hauling my tractor even though I'm not exceeding the sidewall specs. I've been under the impression LTs were not built as tough as STs and couldn't take the load. One by one I think I'll try LTs now. If that doesn't fix my problem I'll grind the fender welds and reweld the fenders higher so I can get a bigger tire on the trailer with a greater load capacity. Tire failures got old a long time ago and I need to find a solution.

Eric
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Re: Need some tire/rim education please In reply to
Eric Patterson wrote:
tod osier wrote:
The industry is trying to sell cheaply made tires that have a larger markup for trailers. Look at the weight of an ST vs an LT size for size - there is a lot more rubber in an LT. Look at the speed ratings of and ST, much lower than an LT. Hang out at an active RV forum and watch the reports of ST failures roll in. LTs have a LOT more tread and last longer.


I'm glad you shared this because I am about to buy yet another tire for my car hauler because of an ST failure. I have gone though at least 6 tires hauling my tractor even though I'm not exceeding the sidewall specs. I've been under the impression LTs were not built as tough as STs and couldn't take the load. One by one I think I'll try LTs now. If that doesn't fix my problem I'll grind the fender welds and reweld the fenders higher so I can get a bigger tire on the trailer with a greater load capacity. Tire failures got old a long time ago and I need to find a solution.

Eric


Find the closest size to match the ST with and LT and compare the weight, I think mine were 8 pounds heavier when I compared, that is a lot of rubber on the and a significant percentage increase. I?ve been using Yokohama geolanders (on my second pair) since they have a size that matches my specs and are not too aggressive to wreck gas mileage, but also have a lot of tread. Matching the specs can be tough.
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Re: Need some tire/rim education please In reply to
Since we are in the topic of trailer tires - what is the proper pressure to put in them. I don?t have either of my trailers nearby so unfortunately I can?t speak with exact specs. I do recall on our speedboat the tires could take up to like 60lbs or more and the tires on the trailer if the 14? Lund trailer would take a similar amount. With my vehicles it is easy to know what to put in the tires but on the trailers, at least the Lund trailer, there is no sticker with recommended tire pressures. There may be stickers in the Yamaha speed boat trailer and maybe on the jet ski trailer as well.

I know that when I put all boats into winter storage I up the pressure to try and prevent flat spotting and since I can?t get to this trailers, put in extra to compensate for the slow leakage that tends to occur.

Thanks
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Re: Need some tire/rim education please In reply to
Mark,
I go by the max pressure rating listed on the sidewall of the tire. I try to keep it at or near max.

Take care, Huntindave McCann Smile SHELL ROCK IA. ,,,,,, "As sailors grow older, the wiser ones move to smaller boats." Thomas Firth Jones, Multihull Voyaging
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Re: Need some tire/rim education please In reply to
tod osier wrote:
Matching the specs can be tough.


Okay. I haven't been back on the computer much since Friday but if I can't find LT tires that would fit my rims, is there something I should look for when changing rims? Or something I should stay away from? Meaning, can I go up in tire size a little? or would that potentially be a problem since it's a dual axle and presumably that would make the tires closer together if I go up in tire size?

How much playing around with specs is okay?
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Re: Need some tire/rim education please In reply to
Dani wrote:
tod osier wrote:
Matching the specs can be tough.


Okay. I haven't been back on the computer much since Friday but if I can't find LT tires that would fit my rims, is there something I should look for when changing rims? Or something I should stay away from? Meaning, can I go up in tire size a little? or would that potentially be a problem since it's a dual axle and presumably that would make the tires closer together if I go up in tire size?

How much playing around with specs is okay?


I had to go up in tire size a bit, but I also needed slightly wider wheel, but only like a 1/2 inch in diameter increase for the tire. The ST tires are nearly always a unique size (my guess is to make this exact process harder). Online there are tire size converters that convert the width and and side ratio to diameter and width. There are 80 million tire sizes out there and if you can find a tire size chart that lists the sizes in order, you can go from your size and just keep going up a size step by step and looking on tirerack.com (or similar). You want to closely match size, but look at capacity and pick a tire with at least what you have/need.

Playing with the sizes, you need to not create clearance issues, so look at the trailer and see the clearance you have to work with knowing that the axles need to move up into the wheel wells.

Last edited by:

tod osier: Feb 17, 2020, 8:34 AM
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Re: Need some tire/rim education please In reply to
Dani wrote:
tod osier wrote:
Matching the specs can be tough.


Okay. I haven't been back on the computer much since Friday but if I can't find LT tires that would fit my rims, is there something I should look for when changing rims? Or something I should stay away from? Meaning, can I go up in tire size a little? or would that potentially be a problem since it's a dual axle and presumably that would make the tires closer together if I go up in tire size?

How much playing around with specs is okay?


This calculator should get you on your way:

https://tiresize.com/converter/

Damn, I hate to pile it on, but wheels can also be offset (they are usually O" offset on campers). If they are offset from the factory (projected out) and you buy new zero offset rims, there can be clearance issues. I went from a zero offset to a wider zero offset.
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Re: Need some tire/rim education please In reply to
Dani,

As Tod says, there can be a lot to understand and absorb when making a complete switch with tires and rims. It might be good if you can hit a local tire shop in their non-busy time of day and just ask for an education and some advice. I'm telling you this, not because of your gender, simply because it's a good place to learn. Now remember, I come from a small town and are used to small town friendliness. A larger town and run em in and run em out business mentality, may not be as helpful.

Take care, Huntindave McCann Smile SHELL ROCK IA. ,,,,,, "As sailors grow older, the wiser ones move to smaller boats." Thomas Firth Jones, Multihull Voyaging
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Re: Need some tire/rim education please In reply to
Mark W wrote:
Since we are in the topic of trailer tires - what is the proper pressure to put in them. I don?t have either of my trailers nearby so unfortunately I can?t speak with exact specs. I do recall on our speedboat the tires could take up to like 60lbs or more and the tires on the trailer if the 14? Lund trailer would take a similar amount. With my vehicles it is easy to know what to put in the tires but on the trailers, at least the Lund trailer, there is no sticker with recommended tire pressures. There may be stickers in the Yamaha speed boat trailer and maybe on the jet ski trailer as well.

I know that when I put all boats into winter storage I up the pressure to try and prevent flat spotting and since I can?t get to this trailers, put in extra to compensate for the slow leakage that tends to occur.

Thanks


Mark,

My boat trailer tires call for 65lbs psi. They are Carlisle Sport Trail LH Bias - 4.80 x 12" LRC/6 ply.
My 28' travel trailer has ST205/75 R14 6 ply and I run 45lbs psi in them

Take care,

Ed L.
East Moline,
Illinois
_________________________________________
If I'd had asked what they wanted they would have said faster horses" - Henry Ford

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Re: Need some tire/rim education please In reply to
Dani wrote:
tod osier wrote:
Matching the specs can be tough.



Okay. I haven't been back on the computer much since Friday but if I can't find LT tires that would fit my rims, is there something I should look for when changing rims? Or something I should stay away from? Meaning, can I go up in tire size a little? or would that potentially be a problem since it's a dual axle and presumably that would make the tires closer together if I go up in tire size?

How much playing around with specs is okay?


Dani,

Todd has you going in the right direction. Since it's a hand me down 24' travel trailer I would suggest pulling it to a RV dealer or RV repair shop and have the tires, axles, bushings, electrical components and brakes inspected. Do you have an equalizer hitch? What ever your driving now it most likely wont match up to Steve's trucks hitch height. The hitch needs to be adjusted properly. If your still driving that Toyota FJ it most likely won't have a 7 prong plug or a brake controller. The 7 prong gives you electricity for braking and charging a onboard 12v battery in the camper. You'll have to have those installed. I know you didn't ask for any of this and maybe you already know this but it's something to think about before you get out on the highway.

Take care,

Ed L.
East Moline,
Illinois
_________________________________________
If I'd had asked what they wanted they would have said faster horses" - Henry Ford

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Re: Need some tire/rim education please In reply to
Dave,

I ask questions here in a large part because of my gender. I have been around here long enough that I do not feel as though people here would deliberately lead me down dangerous paths. I know that here I can at least get a basic understanding of almost anything so that when I go to talk to someone in person, I am not completely uninformed about what I am asking. And the folk here will be honest with me...if what I ask is stupid, reckless, off the wall...people will tell me and often follow up with WHY I need to rethink what I am thinking.

Being a woman can bring great perks and leniencies when it comes to some things. Sometimes the attitudes are very much of a bless your little heart, you are too simple to understand nature. Sometimes folk genuinely want to teach me. Sometimes they see me as an easy mark. Unfortunately I have been on the receiving end far too many times when it comes to vehicle maintenance or fixes of not understanding what is being talked about. And mechanics, some that come highly recommended, have often tried to take advantage. Sadly, I have been burned too often by mechanics that unless my vehicle is obviously in its death throes, I will no longer have anything done until I have two other people vet the information I have been given. One another mechanic and one my dad or brother or uncle.

So, I am not offended at all with what you suggest and it is something that I had already thought of. Asking questions here at least gives me a basic starting point. So hopefully when I do talk to the local folk, they are less inclined to take advantage of me.

Ed,

I have considered that the brakes may need checking out, though do breaks go bad from just sitting? That is an honest question. I do not think they would but I do not know for sure. I do still have the FJ but it will not be used to tow this trailer, except perhaps to move it around my property. I bought Steves truck so I have an adequate towing vehicle for this trailer electricity wise and hauling power/ stopping power wise. The hitch may or may not need some vertical adjusting since the truck was set up for the big trailer. It is something I will have checked out before my first big trip and something I had not considered. I appreciate the thoughts.

Dani
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Re: Need some tire/rim education please In reply to
I get it on the mechanic thing, I hate it when they try to pull it on me and I know it is worse for women. The Toyota dealer that we go to is amazing how bad they upservice women. Standing in line and listening they get the full treatment recommended every time.

Brakes and bearings need looked at. Both are done at the same time. Bearings are an every year thing for most (manufacturer says 15K service interval on mine). If you haven't repacked bearings, it is easy and not too time consuming. Looking at the brakes is easy and you may have to adjust them (easy but weird). One of the main reasons to pack bearings and check brakes is to make sure you don't have an inner seal leak that lets the bearing grease get into the brake guts. Brakes may be self adjusting, which means they just need checked or traditional, which means they need adjusted.

Adjusting the hitch is straightforward, but often needs some seriously large wrenches that aren't commonly had. Is it a weight distributing hitch (does it have bars that need loaded with hitched up?)?

Happy to walk you through any of it you haven't done, it is all easy and takes part of a day.

Dani wrote:
Dave,

I ask questions here in a large part because of my gender. I have been around here long enough that I do not feel as though people here would deliberately lead me down dangerous paths. I know that here I can at least get a basic understanding of almost anything so that when I go to talk to someone in person, I am not completely uninformed about what I am asking. And the folk here will be honest with me...if what I ask is stupid, reckless, off the wall...people will tell me and often follow up with WHY I need to rethink what I am thinking.

Being a woman can bring great perks and leniencies when it comes to some things. Sometimes the attitudes are very much of a bless your little heart, you are too simple to understand nature. Sometimes folk genuinely want to teach me. Sometimes they see me as an easy mark. Unfortunately I have been on the receiving end far too many times when it comes to vehicle maintenance or fixes of not understanding what is being talked about. And mechanics, some that come highly recommended, have often tried to take advantage. Sadly, I have been burned too often by mechanics that unless my vehicle is obviously in its death throes, I will no longer have anything done until I have two other people vet the information I have been given. One another mechanic and one my dad or brother or uncle.

So, I am not offended at all with what you suggest and it is something that I had already thought of. Asking questions here at least gives me a basic starting point. So hopefully when I do talk to the local folk, they are less inclined to take advantage of me.

Ed,

I have considered that the brakes may need checking out, though do breaks go bad from just sitting? That is an honest question. I do not think they would but I do not know for sure. I do still have the FJ but it will not be used to tow this trailer, except perhaps to move it around my property. I bought Steves truck so I have an adequate towing vehicle for this trailer electricity wise and hauling power/ stopping power wise. The hitch may or may not need some vertical adjusting since the truck was set up for the big trailer. It is something I will have checked out before my first big trip and something I had not considered. I appreciate the thoughts.

Dani

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Re: Need some tire/rim education please In reply to
I HATE going to dealerships. I do it rarely and when I do, I always leave there reminded of why I HATE dealerships so much. They seem to be the worst of the worst when it comes to trying to take advantage of people, women especially.

Are there some videos that you might suggest when looking at brakes on what to look for, or even to tell what kind of brakes I have?

Bearings are easy to do. I have done that numerous times. The biggest challenge has often been finding the right bearings to replace old ones with.

Thinking about the hitch I will have to check it out again. The big trailer was a weight distributing hitch that could definitely be adjusted. But that hitch is staying with the big trailer for when it is sold to someone else. Steve always switched out the hitches when changing trailers (camping/boat) so I gotta check to be sure. I know he left the hitch with the trailer when we put it up back at my house and if it is a weight distributing hitch, it makes sense that he would have left it with the trailer so we knew where it was. I will check that this evening.
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Re: Need some tire/rim education please In reply to
Dani wrote:
I HATE going to dealerships. I do it rarely and when I do, I always leave there reminded of why I HATE dealerships so much. They seem to be the worst of the worst when it comes to trying to take advantage of people, women especially.

Are there some videos that you might suggest when looking at brakes on what to look for, or even to tell what kind of brakes I have?

Bearings are easy to do. I have done that numerous times. The biggest challenge has often been finding the right bearings to replace old ones with.

Thinking about the hitch I will have to check it out again. The big trailer was a weight distributing hitch that could definitely be adjusted. But that hitch is staying with the big trailer for when it is sold to someone else. Steve always switched out the hitches when changing trailers (camping/boat) so I gotta check to be sure. I know he left the hitch with the trailer when we put it up back at my house and if it is a weight distributing hitch, it makes sense that he would have left it with the trailer so we knew where it was. I will check that this evening.


There are not many manufacturers of rv running gear. Dexter is the largest. For the brakes, you need to check for grease intrusion from the bearings and brake lining thickness, there isn't much else, just that it moves and it gets adjusted if needed. Are the manuals with the trailer? If you pulled the drum, you can easily match the drum with the drums on etrailer.com or call the trailer manufacturer.

Usually the bearings can just be inspected and repacked, you just need new inner seals (which if you know make and model is easy to get).
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Okay. I do have a weight distributing hitch with this trailer. I know Steve has used it with this truck but I do not know if it was properly set up for this height truck. He bought the trailer when he had his old one ton and I assume he had the hitch set for that truck. But I honestly have no clue.

I have a few places to look to see if I have the manuals for the trailer. Some in the trailer...others might be somewhere in storage in Cocoa. If that is the case then I will likely be better off trying to google what I have. But I shall check all the hidey holes of the trailer to see if Steve left the manuals in the trailer.
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Re: Need some tire/rim education please In reply to
Dani wrote:
Okay. I do have a weight distributing hitch with this trailer. I know Steve has used it with this truck but I do not know if it was properly set up for this height truck. He bought the trailer when he had his old one ton and I assume he had the hitch set for that truck. But I honestly have no clue.

I have a few places to look to see if I have the manuals for the trailer. Some in the trailer...others might be somewhere in storage in Cocoa. If that is the case then I will likely be better off trying to google what I have. But I shall check all the hidey holes of the trailer to see if Steve left the manuals in the trailer.


Let me know what you have for a hitch I have a common one ao there is a chance (Reese Dual Cam) and can help set it up or point you to the correct info.

I'm happy to get you started on all this if you want over the phone or via text, I'm starting to think about camper stuff/repairs for this summer already, so it is on my mind.
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I wanted to give an update and thank everyone for their help.

I went ahead and just replaced the tires with new ones (Goodyear Endurance I believe....the highest ply ratings I could find). The rim that was donated to my yard actually fits the trailer so I didn't have to buy a new spare rim!

I was looking into trying to find LT tires that would fit my rims, or finding something that could be substituted but I really didn't have enough time to try and figure out what I was looking for. I had been hoping to have everything ready for turkey season.

I wasn't able to get the time off to use my permit the way I had hoped and once they enacted the curfew here, my regular stomping grounds were now too far away so I figured it was better to just stick closer to home and learn the woods here. I do still need to check the brakes and I know I need to redo the bearings. I didn't end up doing them when I had the tires off because I didn't think about it until it was too late and I was also short on time that weekend (I wanted to take advantage of a tire sale that was going on). I had hoped to be able to make one trip to the tire shop with all the wheels but turns out I didn't have enough jacks to be able to take all of the wheels off at the same time so I had to make multiple trips to the tire shop.

So, I will take a weekend in the near future and redo the bearings and checking out the brakes to make sure that they are okay.

I wanted to say thanks for the help!
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Dani,

Goodyear Endurance are what came on my trailer and so far, with 12-13k miles are performing just fine. After this thread debuted I did a little digging and found out that these Goodyear tires are now made in the US. Goodyear seems to have put a lot of engineering effort into them - certainly trying to get their reputation back after the Marathon (China bomb) debacle.


Pete


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Re: Need some tire/rim education please In reply to
Glad to hear some good stuff about the Goodyear Endurance. I was a little leery about getting Goodyear after remembering about so many issues in the past. But it was the highest ply rating I could find in town.