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Tom, photos of the TDB decoy curtains from my 17'

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Tom, photos of the TDB decoy curtains from my 17'

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RLLigman: Jul 26, 2020, 5:24 AM
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First photo is the gap in the track that enables you to slide the rear panel in first and then the 40" front panel. Second photo is the shock cord end ring which should work well with the delrin peg you're looking at installing. Third photo. is the outboard view of the welt sewn on. All the wet-look spots are cyanoacrylate glue I added to seal seams and decrease fraying. Fourth photo. is the window cut-out for the stainless hammock hook attachement on the top edge. The last photo is another close-up of the track. Note that there is a strip of foam on the backside of the track that serves as a protective cushion for the decoys. Some of this was missing so I replaced it by using window sealant trim strips, attached with contact cement to the track, just wet both sides and join once the solvent has evaporated away for the best adhesion. Don't get any contact cement on your welt or in the track or you will have that panel mounted semi-permanently. You can see the epoxy layer over the track's mounting flange in the first and last photos. I used two coats of Tuff-Coat non-skid on the floor and inside the decoy compartments, including the underside of the shelves out to their vertical face. I was surprised how well this sheds mud and crud at season's end. Wash it down with soap and water and hose it off and let dry.

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RLLigman: Jul 26, 2020, 2:47 AM
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Tom, I didn't get your pictures taken until late in the day. I ended-up cutting the five foot section of the seven foot starboard gunnel underside wood core piece I cut and fitted to the CSM shell in half to put it back in. Even with a second set of hands to help hold it in place it proved impossible when we tried the dry run installation without any epoxy on the top half. I replaced the last stern-most piece this morning. Using the existing fasteners with wider washers stacked on the nut side worked, but sliding the entire piece in place over the canted Lee rod holders and getting fasteners mounted and tightened proved too difficult. So, now i have the three cross-cut seams to tape with CSM and a bead of thickened epoxy with chopped CSM in it to shoot into the saw cut line on the exterior taper edge where the wood core section tapers back to straight fiberglass, repainting it with the same speckled battleship gray BW used. Then I can reinstall the stern light wire run and the under gunnel LED bank and wiring as well as the braces for the rod holders. The section behind the stern light was "the least fun" to replace and cut. All the drill holes I made last fall to determine how far forward the rot ran from the stern light that also allowed moisture to seep out are partially filled with epoxy. I will level them off with dabs of PC-7 prior painting.

The only pic that may seem confusing is the one with the two drake mallards in it. If you look closely, you can see the foam cushion strip on the back of the exposed track where it would rub against the decoys when the boats is bouncing around while underway.

I shopped around on eBay to find the two net panels that serve to enclose the bow and stern. I prefer this over curtain fabric, since air circulates in these spaces still. I put backing plates on all the fasteners that ran through the decking and then capped them so the dog doesn't get nailed when up in the bow. The rear cargo net is also pouch the enables me to retain stuff I don't want laying in water on the floor.

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RLLigman: Jul 27, 2020, 9:59 AM
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Re: Tom, photos of the TDB decoy curtains from my 17' In reply to
Great, thank you!






The bluebird can sing, but the crow's got the soul.