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Scaup - Beavertail Blind re-configured, and other changes....

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Scaup - Beavertail Blind re-configured, and other changes....
If you remember my previous thread, I re-powered with a 40hp Johnson, that had been converted from remote to tiller. They fabricated a box to house the ignition switch, and added a couple buttons on the tiller for the tilt, but did not include a kill switch. After some part number cross-references, I sourced a new old stock OMC remote wire harness that included a new ignition switch, a kill switch, and horn along with the bezel plates. I had my fingers crossed that it would be nearly a plug and play and it actually is. This change not only adds the critical kill switch I want/need, but allows me to clean up the configuration at the tiller, and move the ignition key to an out of the way, safer from damage location, TBD.

I had to create a replacement bracket however, to mount the neutral switch.





After a little fitting, and finishing:





The new micro-switches arrived on Friday, I still need to locate that, and perhaps shim it to align with the cam on the shifter.





Because the new motor is larger, and tilts, it did not fit the same as the 25hp Suzuki. The Beavertail blind which I really liked was interfering with the motor.
My initial thought was the blind had to go, that there was no way I could use it. Brian Garman, my hunting partner in crime is a great sounding board. Together we
come up with inspired solutions. He had suggested that we eliminate the cross bar, and allow the blind to drop down for motoring.
In practice, I found it did not drop sufficient, but perhaps I could make it pivot, and in addition I could add some adjustment to the height, my only complaint
with the Beavertail 1400 on the Scaup. Last season, the top of the blind was a couple inches below my shoulders. So some hardware was ordered,
some materials collected and some fabrication was done.





The rear post is height adjustable, as is the bow.





I need to build the spacer yet for the bow, but the intent is to pull the blind in the rear and pivot it to starboard. A bracket is being made that
will attach to the coaming, and the rear will drop into it. The post can remain as it is out of the way, but can always be pulled if I want.
At the bow, the pin is longer, and the hitchpin and washer prevent it from being pulled out when unintended. But with one hitchpin, I can pull
the blind off and remove it for storage and summer use!





More in next post.....

Dave Diefenderfer
Manassas, VA

"Once you set out to build a boat, throw away your square. And if you work on her after she's launched, throw away your level." author unknown

Last edited by:

Dave Diefenderfer: Jul 27, 2020, 10:15 AM
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Re: Scaup - Beavertail Blind re-configured, and other changes.... In reply to
The additional height does mean that more changes are needed on the Beavertail. I ordered some Max5 Cordura and will have Mom
sew me some panels that I intend to install with snaps, as removing the entire blind and trying to pass that through a sewing machine
would be tough.

Next project was to open the sponsons for more storage and to gain access to the rear to mount a ladder/platform/ramp. The Devlin
design on the Scaup has a partition in the sponson with foam poured in the rearmost. The front is dead space, good for some storage.

However, in my hull the builder did not install the divider and instead mostly filled the entire sponson with foam.









A very messy, dusty, hot couple hours were needed with a wire cup on my grinder, but it did a decent job that just needs some finish sanding,
and a heavy coat of thickened epoxy rolled on to make sure I seal any bruises the wire wheel may have created.





The openings need some more shaping, and I bought a trim router to radius the edges, then will epoxy seal, and glass over to protect the endgrain. To install the removed flotation,
I have some flexible closed cell foam in 1" sheets. I will make a template and make progressively larger pieces working from the rear forward for about 10" to a foot, then glue a cleat on both sides
and screw a keeper across to keep them from moving. They will always be visible/accessible, and removable if I need to get in and make other changes.

Dave Diefenderfer
Manassas, VA

"Once you set out to build a boat, throw away your square. And if you work on her after she's launched, throw away your level." author unknown

Last edited by:

Dave Diefenderfer: Jul 27, 2020, 2:14 PM