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What's on your WORK BENCH ? - MARCH 2001

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What's on your WORK BENCH ? - MARCH 2001
All~


As has become customary, I will commence with some recent production From the Bench of George Williams:


He claims to be out of shop space....







Like me, it seems George has a well-developed Shipping & Receiving Dept.






A few more that have thus far eluded the bags.






My attention has mostly been on vessels. This new hatch is for an old Sculling Boat. I am currently busy with the fussy job of sanding its topside 'glass (6 oz. set in epoxy) to receive some paint.







This 'glass layup will become a flap board for a modern vessel.






I have also begun progress on some of the scores of gunners. My Broadie-Beak provides air support over my "assembly bench"....






Three bags of Chesapeakes need a variety of treatments. The 3 Drake Mallards will become Drake Black Ducks. They are the standard size. The 4 others are "Superducks" - and will also become Blacks.









The 3 Drakes got epoxy + Homer Coat (finely ground walnut shells) - on both bodies and heads.







The 4 Super Magnums needed some refinement to the head-chest transition - with thickened epoxy (resin + fairing compound).






After coarse sanding and an acetone wipe they got epoxy + fine sawdust on their heads. This is my typical approach for coating foam birds: fine sawdust on the heads and Homer Coat on the bodies.






Stay tuned!


SJS



Steven Jay Sanford
Pencil Brook Farm
South Cambridge, NY
http://www.stevenjaysanford.com


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Re: What's on your WORK BENCH ? - MARCH 2001 In reply to
Rooster, the shovelers were the end of the line, as I fried the rheostat-speed control- on my foot pedal. Darn thing just ran at warp 10. Have ordered a new part, which entailed taking off the foot pedal, and, just in case, did a replacement foot pedal also. I managed to run 54 stool in under three weeks. They are all now sanded and sealed, except for five blacks, that do not need immediate attention. I have a week to paint before the orthopedic surgeon trades my original shoulder-left this time-fir after market parts. Hoping this one goes as well as the right side. It was NOT fun trying to get a 20 ga. SBS to my shoulder. Not a pleasant season.

Hoping to have all back shipshape and Bristol fashion before the trip to Argentina.WhistleWink
george@runamuckdecoys.com
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Re: What's on your WORK BENCH ? - MARCH 2001 In reply to
Cant wait to see paint on those spoonies.


Carl
Mobile, AL
DHBP Member since 1998

"Life is too short to drink bad beer."
Disclaimer: This post and/or report is not a substantiation of or reflection on the true accuracy of the present surveying methods. It is only a report on or comment concerning local observation and/or results. Your results and observation may vary based on your location, local water conditions, food supply, weather conditions and migratory patterns "
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Re: What's on your WORK BENCH ? - MARCH 2001 In reply to
My workbench has been seeing a lot of parts activity. This is going to be the year of machine restorations for me. I have a backlog of six machines and want to get them all done and get back to boat building projects. That's my 2021 workshop goal. A lot of these machines I got from Jeff when he passed away. It was always our plan to move his machines to my shop, sell off the duplicates in favor of the better ones, and get them going again. The first machine, a Powermatic 221 20" planer, is coming along nicely. Can't wait to have it running and the restoration behind me.

The parts on the bench just came out of a hot lye bath followed by a media blasting to remove all the paint. After taping off the machined surfaces they will get primed and painted. The last picture is of the planer, a Powermatic 160 16", I restored about 10 years ago. I will be selling it once the 221 is complete. Hate to see it go but I don't see it getting used much and don't want it idle and taking up room when someone else could enjoy it.

Eric








Last edited by:

Eric Patterson: Mar 2, 2021, 3:12 AM
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Re: What's on your WORK BENCH ? - MARCH 2001 In reply to
SJS/GW
Beautiful work
Eric
Your shop is so clean how can you find anything?
My Christmas present arrived a few day's ago some new carving tools!
So I'm trying them out. DM maybe a urn



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Re: What's on your WORK BENCH ? - MARCH 2001 In reply to
Patrick--Incredible! Hope to see more pictures.

Canvas Harley I just finished painting. Thanks to George Williams along the way!


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Re: What's on your WORK BENCH ? - MARCH 2001 In reply to
Eric,

Very nice restoration. Are you on the Old Woodworking machines website?

Anyone notice the thread title is March 2001?

Rick
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Re: What's on your WORK BENCH ? - MARCH 2001 In reply to
Paul, that is a good looking harlequin. What kinds of paints did you use? Did you seal it with something?
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Re: What's on your WORK BENCH ? - MARCH 2001 In reply to
Richard Lathrop wrote:
Eric,

Very nice restoration. Are you on the Old Woodworking machines website?

Anyone notice the thread title is March 2001?

Rick


I am. Have been for years. Are you? 2001 slipped past my eye.

Eric
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Re: What's on your WORK BENCH ? - MARCH 2001 In reply to
Eric,
What does the hot lye bath do? Rust removal?
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Re: What's on your WORK BENCH ? - MARCH 2001 In reply to
Thank you Dani.

I painted with the Traditions line of acrylics and used their glazing medium to seal. Applied the sealer @ 100 percent. Next time I will dillute to reduce sheen.

Paul
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Re: What's on your WORK BENCH ? - MARCH 2001 In reply to
Spectacular, Paul!


SJS

Steven Jay Sanford
Pencil Brook Farm
South Cambridge, NY
http://www.stevenjaysanford.com


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Re: What's on your WORK BENCH ? - MARCH 2001 In reply to
Thank you.

Will post more pictures of the hen mallard in the background when we make the adjustments you suggested.
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Re: What's on your WORK BENCH ? - MARCH 2001 In reply to
 

Making progress...

Oil on wine case lid.















"Art does not reproduce what is visible - but makes things visible." ~ Paul Klee, artist, 1920
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Re: What's on your WORK BENCH ? - MARCH 2001 In reply to
zane Every wrote:
Eric,
What does the hot lye bath do? Rust removal?


It does nothing for rust. It does remove paint and grease exceedingly well.

Eric
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Re: What's on your WORK BENCH ? - MARCH 2001 In reply to
Eric~


Understood re lye for degreasing. I use phosphoric acid for rust removal.


Your thoughts ?



SJS
Steven Jay Sanford
Pencil Brook Farm
South Cambridge, NY
http://www.stevenjaysanford.com


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Re: What's on your WORK BENCH ? - MARCH 2001 In reply to
Steve

In a nutshell, I try and preserve the finish as original. For looks and for function.

My method of rust removal depends on the underlying metal and what I'm trying to accomplish. If I'm painting over the metal and do not care about discoloration caused by acid removal then phosphoric (strong) or acetic (weak) acid based removers are fine. If I want to avoid discoloration caused by strong acids on a surface that shows, for example a sander or drill press cast iron top, I use mechanical means such as a razor blade scraper or wire wheel, or a series of ever increasing grit abrasives, up to 2000 grit, to restore a factory shine. If it is a machined surface that interfaces with another part I stick to wire wheels so as not to remove any material. I also bead blast to remove paint and rust in hard to reach areas and on small parts. I've found glass bead blasting on machined mating surfaces doesn't remove material, unlike silica blasting, and they can be hit with the wire wheel to restore the original surface and its properties. A hot dip in a strong lye solution can remove a lot of paint with little effort and I like that. It just depends on the situation.

Hope this answers the question.

Eric

Last edited by:

Eric Patterson: Mar 3, 2021, 1:55 PM
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Re: What's on your WORK BENCH ? - MARCH 2001 In reply to
Eric

I'm trying to resist looking and commenting cuz I know it'll lead me down a new rabbit hole. One of your previous "old machinery restoration" posts got me started to the point of reproducing the original badges on 1940's era machinery. Luckily, I pulled up before I crash landed and was consumed with a new hobby. I must say I admire your abilities. Ever have any leftover parts? Lol.

Last edited by:

Brad Bortner: Mar 4, 2021, 9:41 AM
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Re: What's on your WORK BENCH ? - MARCH 2001 In reply to
Thanks, Eric~


I've used most of these approaches one time or another.


One more question: Do you use wax or any other protection on the table tops, e.g., drill press, band saw, table saw? I have used auto waxes but always avoided silicons so I would not contaminate any lumber.


Your thoughts?


SJS

Steven Jay Sanford
Pencil Brook Farm
South Cambridge, NY
http://www.stevenjaysanford.com


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Re: What's on your WORK BENCH ? - MARCH 2001 In reply to
All~


I don't think I ever posted when I finished this old tool chest - and brought it inside from my shop.






I cannot find any "before" photos. It had been painted a turquoisey-blue with black accents. And, the edges of the lid and base had been banded with iron/steel.






The consensus from my friends hereabout is that these chests were most likely not factory-made. Rather, each carpenter built his own - and displayed his craftsmanship thereby. As an example, each dovetail looks perfect to my eye.









Although there were stepped chocks on either end inside, any tool trays were long gone when I got this a year or so ago. I added the screw eyes and some decoy line to hold the lid upright when opened.







Several hexes were inscribed inside the lid.






After stripping - chemical, scraper, sandpaper - I de-rusted the hardware, then finished everything with Tung Oil. The wood got about 5 coats, the hardware just 2 coats.







If you know anything about these old tool chests, please let me know. A good friend has one very similar - but in almost mint original condition. We are happy to have it in our living room.


All the best,


SJS



Steven Jay Sanford
Pencil Brook Farm
South Cambridge, NY
http://www.stevenjaysanford.com


Quote Reply
Re: What's on your WORK BENCH ? - MARCH 2001 In reply to
Brad

Thank you for the compliments. Machine badges is one thing I've not figured out. After a coat of wax to try and brighten what is left of the paint I'm out of ideas :) That one area can get pretty technical and you have to know graphics packages and printing technologies. Another rabbit hole for sure. One thing is for certain, there are a lot of people restoring vintage machines and a ton of info available online. I know I can get on youtube and find all kinds of tips and simply enjoy watching how others bring machines back to life. Since I am going to be doing a bunch of restorations this year (six planned) I want to photo/video one from start to finish and share it here. I think you will like it.

Steve

That is a beautiful tool chest. I've never seen a spirograph in a tool chest. That's a new one. I wonder what the motivation behind it was? I do agree, they were typically made by the craftsman to store and haul the tools used each day to and from the job. There were some companies that made wood tool chests, most notably Gerstner, but those were typically found in machinist shops. The ones I've seen similar to yours were made by furniture makers and repairers. I'm sure you've seen the Studley (piano maker) toolbox. If not google it and prepared to be astonished. As for wax, yes I use it all the time on cast iron surfaces such as table saw, drill press, shaper, and planer tables, in addition to saw fences. I really like good old Johnson's paste wax in the yellow can. It prevents rust on bare metal surfaces, makes wood glide more easily, is really easy to apply, and will not interfere with finishes. Once, maybe twice a year, my machines get a little love from the yellow can and a cotton rag.

Eric

p.s. Steve, your wood floors are gorgeous.

Last edited by:

Eric Patterson: Mar 4, 2021, 5:20 AM
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Re: What's on your WORK BENCH ? - MARCH 2001 In reply to
Steve,

I had always heard those tool chests were part of the journeyman process for carpenters. They would build their own chests to house their tools as they progressed.

Eric,

I have used most of the techniques you list. I am a fan of electrolysis to convert rust and it does a good job of removing paint as well. I have done a lye using a stock water tank from Tractor Supply disposal of the lye and paint was always a concern.

Rick
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Re: What's on your WORK BENCH ? - MARCH 2001 In reply to
Steve,

What a great restoration on that tool chest!

My scouring the architectural restoration warehouses in my area when I'm in search of interesting panels or accents to add to deadmount tableaus has given me a whole new appreciation for what can be done with the right pieces, even when they have been painted over and partially damaged.


MLBob

"Art is like an ill-trained Labrador retriever that drags you out into traffic." (Annie Dillard)

....Here's to Joe Wooster, who made me realize that the useful could and should be beautiful; and who firmly believed that decoy carvers were the last free men in America.

https://www.facebook.com/KOOIdecoy?ref=hl

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Re: What's on your WORK BENCH ? - MARCH 2001 In reply to
I've been creeping along on the painting of my latest deadmount carving.

Still haven't decided how it should be presented. Toying with the idea of making it part of a multi-bird, diving duck tableau

.









MLBob

"Art is like an ill-trained Labrador retriever that drags you out into traffic." (Annie Dillard)

....Here's to Joe Wooster, who made me realize that the useful could and should be beautiful; and who firmly believed that decoy carvers were the last free men in America.

https://www.facebook.com/KOOIdecoy?ref=hl

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Re: What's on your WORK BENCH ? - MARCH 2001 In reply to
It does nothing for rust. It does remove paint and grease exceedingly well.

Eric


Did not know that. Thar's why I like this forum. ya learn something new all the time.

Zane