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Save or Not?
Some of you may remember I posted pics of this boat I bought last year. My intention was to make a spring/summer rehab project of it and breathe new life into her. I cleaned about 4lbs of dirt, rat and wasp nests out of her today to get a good look at what I was facing.

I already knew I was l going to have to replace the transom, sponsons, 2 bulkheads, topside deck and coaming. With the exception of the transom area, the bottom and sides looked pretty solid.

Before I really dig into this thing I wanted some opinions from the brain trust on whether this is a worthwhile project or not. I felt pretty good about it until I saw how this boat is built.

From these pics, it looks like the bottom is two layers of 1/4? ply laminated together. There was a small hole in the chine of the starb side. I ground into it a bit a fairly large gap opened up between the layers. If you look hard enough you can see glass on the first/interior bottom layer. From this small sample, I can only assume that the second/exterior layer was added later..and there are air gaps between the layers.

In the transom and sponsons, there appears to be a composite layer between the transom and ply bottom. I don?t know how far up it runs but I?m unfamiliar with this construction technique.

So.. too far gone?
Too many unknowns?
Keep dismantling and see where it goes?
Haul to dump?

Thoughts?



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Re: Save or Not? In reply to
I don't like what I'm seeing, I do not think I'd proceed. The rot itself has me hesitant, but the double bottom that is poorly bonded is pretty definitive for me. I think you could build a new boat for what you will put into that.

Last edited by:

tod osier: May 2, 2022, 3:12 AM
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Re: Save or Not? In reply to
 Time spent rehabbing might be spent on a new project or new boat. Had a jersey boat, would take to much time and money. Opted on a better project.
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Re: Save or Not? In reply to
From pics you,ve showed and descriptions of construction I,d cut my losses and haul away. Your Money & time are better spent on constructing a boat properly.
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Re: Save or Not? In reply to
I'd rather spend 200 hours building new than 100 hours rebuilding rot.

Eric
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Re: Save or Not? In reply to
Chad~


I'm inclined toward the consensus....


Here's some inspiration for you:


http://www.duckboats.net/cgi-bin/forum/gforum.cgi?post=247665;do=post_view;search_string=death%20of%20a%20duckboat#p247665


All the best,


SJS







Steven Jay Sanford
Pencil Brook Farm
South Cambridge, NY
http://www.stevenjaysanford.com


Quote Reply
Re: Save or Not? In reply to
Thank you all for the input and confirming what I was already thinking. The bottom is what really had me concerned but before I tossed her in the trash I needed some conformation that she was too far gone.

Despite there being a lot I don?t like about the way this boat was constructed, I love the swooping sponsons, large open cockpit and the overall lines. Thanks again for the advice!

.
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Re: Save or Not? In reply to
Would you trust your life in that boat after rehabbing it? Not questionning your abilities, just your comfort level in that boat.

Mark
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Re: Save or Not? In reply to
Mark W wrote:
Would you trust your life in that boat after rehabbing it? Not questionning your abilities, just your comfort level in that boat.

Mark



For conversation sake, the answer would be, yes. After extensive examination, stripping, rebuilding, replacing, new epoxy filets, tape, mat, flotation, etc..I would hunt out of it during winter months.

My plan was to cut the top decks off, gut the foam and throughly inspect the chines, bottom and sides. If all that was solid and without rot, I would move forward with cutting out and replacing everything I knew was bad. My boat building experience, I admit, is a bit lacking but with the help of this forum and past experiences, I guessed I could handle the rehab. Unfortunately it did not take extensive surveying to uncover fatal flaws. That poorly laminated bottom is what really scared me.

Last edited by:

ChadW: May 3, 2022, 7:59 AM
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Re: Save or Not? In reply to
ChadW wrote:
Mark W wrote:
Would you trust your life in that boat after rehabbing it? Not questionning your abilities, just your comfort level in that boat.

Mark



For conversation sake, the answer would be, yes. After extensive examination, stripping, rebuilding, replacing, new epoxy filets, tape, mat, flotation, etc..I would hunt out of it during winter months.

My plan was to cut the top decks off, gut the foam and throughly inspect the chines, bottom and sides. If all that was solid and without rot, I would move forward with cutting out and replacing everything I knew was bad. My boat building experience, I admit, is a bit lacking but with the help of this forum and past experiences, I guessed I could handle the rehab. Unfortunately it did not take extensive surveying to uncover fatal flaws. That poorly laminated bottom is what really scared me.


Got it. Then the question becomes is it worth the time and expense verses moving on. That's your call.

Not nearly he same thing but I purchased a fairly beaten up Ducker a few years back (got it for a heck of a deal). I looked at all the options to get it back perfect and had a plan. I then had an epiphany and figured I had better take it out as is and see if I even liked hunting out of it. Long story short - I didn't like it nearly as much as other boats I had on hand. Plan changed from full restoration to I pounding out dents, stripping it down, welding a couple of holes and painting it. Took it hunting a couple of times for nostalgia purposes then sold it.

Mark
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Re: Save or Not? In reply to
Chad,

If you like the lines of the boat you could use the current boat as a model to build another boat.

Rick Lathrop