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On X app
I was not aware of this app until this weekend when two different groups of hunters ended up trying to set up on private land and also in the Refuge. The reason I post this is to relay that one needs to do their research before assuming that the maps are completely accurate. That should be the norm but obviously some aren't aware of this issue. Both groups came long distances planning to hunt these restricted areas. Whether they found other sites or not, I don't know. Bummer way to start off season.
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On X pulls its information from a county's Geographic Information System (GIS) which is usually maintained by the Tax Assessor's Office. These records are sometimes wrong. Further, one of the issues that On X has is they do not pull from a GIS catalog every time you need GIS data. They periodically archive a county's records and then will use that information for months/years before refreshing. Plus, county records are not immediately updated when land changes hands. Sometimes that doesn't happen for a year or so. What all this does is create situations where the landowner information is woefully outdated. I only trust, make that halfway trust, On X when I'm familiar with an area and know it hasn't exchanged hands in years.

Eric

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Eric Patterson: Oct 18, 2021, 5:52 AM
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Re: On X app In reply to
Yep, any GIS is only as good as long it's updated often and has a rigorous QAQC procedure.
Hard lesson in not depending on one source of information when planning a trip.
I bet the app has a disclaimer that says they aren't responsible for errors.


Carl
Mobile, AL
DHBP Member since 1998

"Life is too short to drink bad beer."
Disclaimer: This post and/or report is not a substantiation of or reflection on the true accuracy of the present surveying methods. It is only a report on or comment concerning local observation and/or results. Your results and observation may vary based on your location, local water conditions, food supply, weather conditions and migratory patterns "

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Carl: Oct 18, 2021, 8:34 AM
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Re: On X app In reply to
Super useful tool, but you do need to do your research. I don't use it alone in small (tight) areas, but out west it works absolutely wonderfully.
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One pair of goose hunting partners use it routinely, along with some copies of the county plat map twsp pages of interest. No system is foolproof. We have set-up on unposted land while in NoDakk, prior the new system's implementation and have been confronted by the landowner telling us to leave. In one instance, it actually was a local guide down in the Jamestown area who was also posting private lands he did not own...or lease.
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Hi All,

In Eastern Montana now hunting Upland species, OnX is working great most of the time. However, after finding Public land on OnX it is best to check the true Data Source (ex: Montana FWP site) for updates on that particular land. The updates could show that land has actually become off-limits (due to drought, etc) or gone from off-limits to accessible (Ex: drought/fire hazard no longer making land inaccessible). The further you travel to hunt, the more important it is that you do this true Data Source check.
'Hope this helps.

Dave
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Have not used OnX. Here in Maine, we still largely have a tradition of access to private land and sorting out the ownership is not critical, at least in the unorganized townships and more rural organized towns. And our state law is that access to unposted land, even for hunting, is allowed unless notified by the owner that it's not. That changes as areas get more developed, but I live 5 miles from the state capital and except for "safety zone" signs around houses, there is no posted land on my road.

I will make a plug for another GIS app, GAIA GPS. For an annual fee, it gives me USGS topo; NOAA Charts; state-owned lands; a public lands layer; a private lands layer that identifies the owner (though not everywhere in Maine), and satellite at several different resolutions. I think it's $40 a year.

The public lands layer was really useful when I was fishing in NW Wyoming in areas with a mix of BLM, Forest Service, State and private land. I ran into a local game warden and asked him if I could safely use it to find the public parcels with river access. He'd never seen the app before, but when I showed it to him, he said it was spot on in the areas he knew well.

As a GPS, the app is as good as any I've used. If you download the USGS and NOAA and other base maps, it works with great accuracy even with no cell service. I only wish battery life on my phone was better.

What other mapping apps are folks using?

"At first blush I am tempted to conclude that a satisfactory hobby must be in large degree useless, inefficient, laborious, or irrelevant."
— Aldo Leopold
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It's been a game changer for me, so far everything has been spot on accurate for where I live and hunt (Idaho and Utah) and it seems to be updated every few days to keep things current.




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I began using OnX this fall, primarily for deer after choosing not to use it previously.

Here are a few things I really like:

1) The ability to see who owns the private land next to public land along with their address. It makes it easier to track down home owners if you want to speak to the land owner.

2) The map layer that shows hardwoods and distinguishes between oaks/beech/hickory and less valuable hardwoods. It's not fool proof, but it does reflect most of the oaks stands I have found.

3) The ability to know exactly where I am in relation not only to boundaries but also in the middle of a woods or thicket and see where I am on the screen.

I use it in conjunction not only with a compass but also my Garmin Oregon. I prefer to use the Garmin for my waypoints and tracks because I keep a data base with notes about scouting and info on my waypoints and tracks.

For $30 a year per state, I think it's a bargain.

Larry